New recipes

Rieska

Rieska


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Updated November 14, 2014

1/2

cup old-fashioned rolled oats

1

cup dark or light rye flour, or pumpernickel flour

1

cup Gold Medal™ unbleached all-purpose flour

2

teaspoons baking powder

4

tablespoons unsalted butter

Hide Images

  • 1

    Preheat oven to 500°F. Lightly grease a 13-by-9-inch baking dish and set aside.

  • 2

    In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together oats, rye flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar. Add butter in small cubes and cut into the dry mix, using a fork or pastry blender, until the butter is thoroughly distributed. Stir in buttermilk until well combined.

  • 3

    Pour batter into prepared dish and spread evenly with a spatula. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until top of bread is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

  • 4

    Remove from oven and allow to cool in baking dish completely before slicing or serving.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • In case you’ve been toiling your days away searching for the easiest, yet most delicious, sandwich bread to make in your home kitchen (please don’t tell me I’ve been the only one!), you can stop now.

    This recipe is the answer.

    You think I’m kidding? Consider this, then: this bread – this Rieska, this Finnish wonder of ridiculously easy bread baking – is done in less than 30 minutes. Not 30 minutes. LESS than 30 minutes. And if you have the patience to let it cool for a bit, it makes a mighty fine sandwich. True story.

    What makes this bread particularly amazing is that it’s durable enough to hold a few slices of meat, cheese and veggies, but soft, moist and cakey enough to warrant its “quick bread” category. It takes less time to throw together than it does for me to get dressed in the morning, and its buttery and mildly sweet flavor is unusually refreshing – not at all how you’d expect it to taste at first sight. It’s rustic and reliable and made with wholesome ingredients, like rolled oats and rye flour. To me, that’s a winner.

    Of course, this isn’t the end-all, be-all to sandwich bread. It doesn’t hold up that well to paninis and other hot, grilled sandwiches, but it does, for example, make a mean prosciutto, Swiss and veggie sandwich. It also tastes delicious un-sandwiched, with a pat of butter spackled across the top or with a dollop of cream cheese and tart jam. And if it helps me end my toiled days of sandwich bread baking, even if just for a while, I think it’s worth keeping around.

    Stephanie (aka Girl Versus Dough) joined Tablespoon to share her adventures in the kitchen. Check out Stephanie’s Tablespoon member profileand keep checking back for her own personal recipes on Tablespoon!


Quick Finnish Flatbread with Oats and Barley (Rieska)

Published: Nov 25, 2020 · Modified: Jan 11, 2021 by Kristi · This post may contain affiliate links.

Looking for an easy, homemade bread you can whip up in less than 30 minutes? This Quick Finnish Flatbread is made with wholesome ingredients and comes together FAST. Serve generous squares warm from the pan alongside your favorite soup or stew or slathered with butter and drizzled with honey.


R – Rieska – Baked Potato Flatbread From Finland – A-Z flat breads Around The World

When I was looking for a flat bread for the alphabet R, I came across this Finnish potao flat bread Rieska. With potato as the base, this flat bread was so different from the normal all purpose ones. So I immediately bookmarked the recipe. BAsed on the ingredient used, rieska comes in four varieties. Perunarieska made with potato, Ohrarieska made with barley, Ruisrieska made with rye and Ruisrieska made with milk. They are served warm with butter and consumed with milk.

Today’s version combines barley and potato, so the author stopped with the name Rieska. These are baked until golden. If you pat the dough thin, you will get nice crunchy rieska, but with a little thicker discs, you will get soft rieska. I served it along with butter and tomato sauce. Recently I have started adding carbs in my diet and I felt that I should taste these, as I was skeptical to serve Sruti with barley. I rather enjoyed the breads since it has been a long time I had breads. I was really happy that the breads were amazing. I have added an egg in the dough, but if you want to make it eggless, then add two to three tablespoon of yogurt instead.

Recipe Source: Honest Cooking

Makes 4 Breads

Ingredients:

Boil, peel and mash potatoes.

Add barley flour, salt and an egg and combine to make a soft and sticky dough.


Lists including this dish: 0 of 0

No list has this Dish

Latest dishes

Majarisco (Ecuadorian) (Peruvian)
Majarisco is a traditional dish from Ecuador and the Tumbes region in Peru. It is a seafood version of the …

Majado Majado De Yuca, Majado De… (Peruvian)
Majado is a traditional dish from the Piura region in Peru. It is made by roasting plantains or yucas and …

Oats Mango Kheer Mango Kheer (Indian)
Oats Mango Kheer is an easy Indian dessert made with milk, oats, mangoes, and goodness of nuts.

Pastel De Acelga Chard Tart (Peruvian)
Pastel de acelga is a savory pie filled with chard mainly.

Top Lists

List Of Beers In America By Alcohol Content ABV

by itisclaudio (2 ) Public List

Abita Select Amber Ale (American)

Blue Moon Belgian Whi… (American)

Bud Ice Beer (American)

List Of Hard Seltzers In America By Calories

by itisclaudio (2 ) Public List

Barefoot Hard Seltzer (American)

Bon & Viv Spiked Selt… Bon & Viv Spiked Seltzer (American)


Rieska - Finnish Flat Bread

This was a fun recipe to make -- not at all involved and time-consuming like the yeast breads. I looked up the word "Rieska" -- in Finnish, it means unleavened barley bread. Now the bread here is unleavened, in that it does not have yeast (it does have baking powder and soda). But, it is not made from barley.

I was not 100% sure what "graham flour" was. I was familiar, of course, with graham crackers - a favorite childhood snack. I looked at the King Arthur Flour online store and found that whole wheat pastry flour is also called graham flour. I did not have high hopes for finding it in my grocery store, but they did have graham flour in the organic section. I also had to go on a bit of a grocery search to find buttermilk - not thatunusual an ingredient. Happily, I found it at the second store I looked at.


And the other question was this -- what temperature is a "hot oven"? I looked through some of the other recipes in the book -- one from my grandmother, in fact, equated a hot oven to 400 degrees Farenheit. So, that's what I went with! The results - a tasty flat bread. Crusty on the outside and a moist crumb inside. A nice, non-sweet snack with a cup of tea.

Here are the revised and original recipes.

The Revised Recipe: Rieska - Finnish Flat Bread
Makes 3 flat loaves

2 cups buttermilk
1 tsp. baking soda, mixed with 1 Tablespoon hot water
4 Tbsp. melted butter
1/2 cup sour cream
2 1/2 cups graham flour
2 1/2 cups white flour
3 tsp. baking powder
2 Tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Farenheit. Sift together the graham flour, white flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Set aside. In a large bowl, mix together the buttermilk, baking soda in water, melted butter and sour cream. Gradually add the sifted dry ingredients and mix together. Do not knead. The dough will be fairly sticky. Separate the dough into three pieces. On a lightly floured board, roll each piece out to about 1/2 inch thick. Transfer to a baking sheet and prick the bread all over with a fork. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes, until golden brown around the edges and on the bottom.

The Original Recipe: Finnish Flat Bread (Rieskaa)
source: Recipes and Finnish Specialties, St. Paul Lutheran Church - Gloucester, MA

2 cups buttermilk
1 tsp. baking soda, mixed with a little hot water
4 tbsp melted butter or shortening
1/2 cup sour cream

Sift together:
2 1/2 cups graham flour
2 1/2 cups white flour
3 tsp baking powder
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt

and add to liquid mixture. Do not knead. Separate into 3 parts. Roll out lightly to about 1/2 inch thick and bake in a hot oven for 10 - 15 minutes. Prick with fork before baking. When baked, place one over the other with a towel between them to make crust soft.


Rieska - Recipes

Rieska, this bread is quite a popular one in Finland which is usually baked with healthy grain aka Barley flour. Though Rieska is a traditional Finnish flatbread, its preparation varies across the country. As i told earlier often it’s made with barley flour, sometimes this bread calls for oat or rye flour, and even potato which is popular as well. The thickness of rieska can vary too from cracker-thin to thick-and-bready. No leavening agents is needed for making this thin crispy flabread, however some Rieska recipes calls for baking powder if baked as a thick bread like Rieska. I went with a thin, crispy flatbread with mashed potatoes, which is a popular version of Rieska. Usually baked at high temprature, this bread are baked in tandoor/wood fired like oven, but its really easy to bake this crispy flatbread at home itself. With less efforts and less ingredients, this Rieska gets ready very much prefectly at home with simple ingredients in it.

The original recipe of thie Scandinavian bread calls for either spelt flour and barley, but i went with spelt flour and quick cooking oats as oats is always added in most of the Rieska. Obviously this bread is very healthy and rich in fiber. When enjoyed with herbed cream cheese or with some chunky sauce, these flatbread tastes absolutely delicious. We had this Rieska with some potato and chickpeas salad and we loved it. Coming to this Finnish flatbread, the original recipe calls for an egg, which i completely skipped here by replacing with flaxseed meal. And this Rieska is going for this month's blogging marathon as am running with A-Z baking around the world as theme. We have been blogging non-stop since 2 weeks with Sundays off.My fellow marathoners are bringing out many incredible bakes one by one,each and everyday and my bookmark list is getting already overbooked. Seriously am enjoying this whole month of blogging.

Recipe Source: Here
1+1/2cup Mashed potato
1/2cup Spelt flour
1/2cup Quick cooking oat
1tbsp Flaxseed meal
Salt

Preheat the oven to 428F/220C. Mix the flaxseed meal in warm water and let it sit for a while.

Now take the mashed potato, spelt flour, quick cooking oats, flaxseed meal mixture salt, add enough water and make a dough.

Dough may be sticky but dont worry. Divide the dough into 4 portions.

Place a ball of dough on a baking tray line with baking paper and flatten it with flour dusted fingers as a round shaped disk.


Swedish Cinnamon Buns (Kanelbullar)

These traditional Swedish cinnamon buns (Kanelbullar) are made with a sweet, buttery cardamom dough and a brown sugar cinnamon filling. They are exceptionally soft and tender thanks to a special technique called the tangzhong method: A small amount of the flour and liquid is cooked on the stove for a very short period of time creating a roux-like mixture. This process gelatinizes the starches in the flour allowing them to absorb more liquid and results in a higher rise and a more tender, moist bun that stays that way for a longer period of time. The dough is silky and smooth, and the buns emerge from the oven soft and tender with a golden brown crust. This simple, 5 minute technique is well worth your time!


Rieska

It’s official. My case of cabin fever has moved beyond the stage of being curable — at least, that is, by anything other than time. No amount of willpower, movie watching, exercising, music listening, Valentine’s Day-ing (though I must say my valentine is one very bright spot, even in these sunless days) or cookie eating is going to tear me from the threshold of these winter blues.

It happens every year, and so I’ve come to expect it and, like a flower wrapped tightly in its bud, wait (mostly) patiently for the impending thaw of springtime, when it bursts in a colorful force through the crunchy gray snow and melts all of it — and my wintry woes — away.

In the waiting, however, I’ve learned to create for myself an arsenal of survival tools — a really good book, some good company, a few cups of warm tea. And now, perhaps, this bread, as rustic and reliable as one needs when he or she is feeling cabin feverish. This bread — this rieska, this Finnish wonder of ridiculously easy bread baking — is a true companion in these darker days.

I don’t know what it is about this recipe that first caught my attention. Maybe it was the simplicity of it, or the basic roll call of ingredients. Maybe it was the description — a “cakey drop biscuit,” an “easy baking powder bread,” “packed with whole grains.” Or, perhaps, it was the adventure of creating something I never had before.

Or, maybe it was because I just wanted a really good sandwich.

In any case, rieska is one recipe I won’t be leaving behind. It’s durable enough to hold a few slices of meat, cheese and veggies, but soft and moist enough to warrant its “cakey” descriptor. It takes less time to throw together than it does for me to get dressed in the morning, and its buttery and mildly sweet flavor is unusually refreshing — not at all how you’d expect it to taste at first sight. It’s just the thing for those, like me, who are anxiously counting down the days to when the sun re-emerges from behind the clouds, when the birds start chirping and the chilly trees clothe themselves once again in fragile, flapping green leaves. Until then, this bread will keep me satisfied.

Rieska
Courtesy of King Arthur Flour

Yields: 2 dozen 2-inch squares

Ingredients:
1/2 cup old fashioned rolled oats
1 cup dark or light rye flour, or pumpernickel flour (I used dark rye)
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups buttermilk

Directions:
Preheat oven to 500 degrees F. Lightly grease a 13-by-9-inch baking dish and set aside.
In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together oats, rye flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar. Add butter in small cubes and cut into the dry mix, using a fork or pastry blender, until the butter is thoroughly distributed. Stir in buttermilk until well combined.
Pour batter into prepared dish and spread evenly with a spatula. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until top of bread is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow to cool in baking dish completely before slicing or serving.


Are you on Pinterest? Pin these for later read!

The person and creative behind Pretty Wild World and The Kitchen Abroad, Evan Kristine is a classically trained chef in Finland for over a decade. She is an expert on Finland travel and Finnish cuisine whose goal is to deliver fun and informational guides introducing Finland as a unique travel destination.

Recent Posts

If you're wondering what to do when you visit summer in Finland then you've come to the right place! Some of the notable experience right off the bat includes sauna – surprise? I've lived in.

Finland is known for many things including having one of the most difficult languages to learn. However, as daunting as it may sound, saying Hello in Finnish is perhaps the easiest to learn for most.


Watch the video: Kannattaako y-tunnukselle pankkikortti? VLOG (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Amaury

    You realize, in told...

  2. Fitzhugh

    In my opinion, mistakes are made. Write to me in PM, discuss it.

  3. Nawfal

    After reading, even me, the topic became interesting.

  4. Mozshura

    As for me, the meaning is expanded beyond nowhere, the person has done the maximum, for which respect him!

  5. Haroun Al Rachid

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are not right. I suggest it to discuss. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.



Write a message