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Coca-Cola Adds Another Fruity, Sugary Water

Coca-Cola Adds Another Fruity, Sugary Water


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So... it's basically a new Vitaminwater?

After new reports showed that Americans are drinking more water than soda for the first time in three decades, we could only predict that the major soda companies would do something to win back customers. Turns out, they're doing it with another fizzy, sweet drink: introducing Fruitwater, a sucralose-sweetened fruity seltzer water.

The Associated Press reports that the drink still falls under Glaceau, the same company that makes Smartwater and Vitaminwater, but it's not sweeted with Stevia, like Vitaminwater. Instead, it's sweetened with sucralose (better known as Splenda). And surprise — it doesn't contain any fruit juice. (But why would you think that? Vitaminwater isn't healthy either.)

It's clear that Coca-Cola and other companies are hoping fizzy drinks will get them out of the soda slump, and rightfully so — the AP notes that according to Beverage Digest, Glaceau's overall sales volume grew by 4 percent last year. And that's despite the fact that Vitaminwater came into some legal trouble last year for "deceptive" health claims in its marketing.


Coca-Cola Faces Harsh Backlash After CEO Blasts Georgia Election Laws — ‘Patriots Will Choose Another Beverage’

30,955 Scott Olson/Getty Images

A massive backlash against Coca-Cola sparked after the Georgia-based company’s CEO, James Quincey, said the recently-passed Georgia voting laws aimed at improving state election integrity are “unacceptable,” “wrong,” and “a step backward.”

Quincey, who joined the Coca-Cola company in 1996, appeared on CNBC on Wednesday criticizing the new legislation and stating that “we will continue to advocate” against the new laws “both in private and … public.” Many took to Twitter to voice their discontent with his statements.

“The guy who peddles sugar water that makes you obese wants to control the way you think,” author and former congressional candidate Buzz Patterson wrote:

The guy who peddles sugar water that makes you obese wants to control the way you think. @CocaCola https://t.co/SN2PUY29zQ

&mdash Buzz Patterson (@BuzzPatterson) April 1, 2021

“Patriots will choose another beverage,” Fox News host Laura Ingraham noted. “Big mistake by @CocaCola . Don’t poke the bear.”:

Patriots will choose another beverage. Big mistake by @CocaCola. Don’t poke the bear. https://t.co/J3DieHLVsb

&mdash Laura Ingraham (@IngrahamAngle) April 1, 2021

“I guess the #BeLessWhite training wasn’t an anomaly,” author Jim Hanson wrote, referencing a recent report which described Coca-Cola ‘anti-racism’ training materials that reportedly instructed employees to “be less white.”

“Wonder how Coke became ‘woke’? Here’s a clue,” political commentator Dinesh D’Souza said as he shared a link to an Asia Times article where the Coca-Cola president “lauds the quick and decisive action of the Chinese government in combating the coronavirus.”:

Wonder how Coke became “woke”? Here’s a clue.

Coca-Cola boss: We're sticking with China all the way – Asia Times https://t.co/jFIht0OcN2

&mdash Dinesh D'Souza (@DineshDSouza) April 1, 2021

“The majority of Americans favor voter ID & laws to protect elections,” actress Alana Stewart commented. “The left threatened to boycott @CocaCola & CEO James Quincey caved. Boycotts work both ways.”

“Many patriotic Americans will no longer be buying #Coke , including me. Bad move @CocaCola ,” she added:

The majority of Americans favor voter ID & laws to protect elections. The left threatened to boycott @CocaCola & CEO James Quincey caved. Boycotts work both ways. Many patriotic Americans will no longer be buying #Coke, including me. Bad move @CocaCola. #BoycottCocaColaCo

&mdash Alana Stewart (@AlanaKStewart) April 1, 2021

“ @CocaCola supports a country that runs concentration camps in China more than facts, human rights, the State of Georgia where it’s headquartered,” journalist Curtis Houck wrote. “Pass it on.”

[email protected] supports a country that runs concentration camps in China more than facts, human rights, the State of Georgia where it's headquartered. Pass it on.

&mdash Curtis Houck (@CurtisHouck) April 1, 2021

“So while Coca-Cola savages Georgia for lawfully enacting legislation to improve election integrity, they celebrate an unconstitutional executive decree legalizing an illegal workforce,” Stephen Miller, former Senior Advisor to President Trump, wrote.

“Wouldn’t it be nice if major corporations were loyal to the American People?” he added:

So while Coca-Cola savages Georgia for lawfully enacting legislation to improve election integrity, they celebrate an unconstitutional executive decree legalizing an illegal workforce. Wouldn’t it be nice if major corporations were loyal to the American People? https://t.co/L9gMbXdCB5

&mdash Stephen Miller (@StephenM) April 1, 2021

“ @CocaCola CEO FALSELY claims Georgia’s new voting law doesn’t guarantee broad access or ensure election integrity, caving to the ‘woke’ left,” Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS) posted on Twitter.

“The TRUTH is the law expands early voting & makes voting more secure,” he added. “He’s sharing a false narrative. Shame!”

[email protected] CEO FALSELY claims Georgia’s new voting law doesn’t guarantee broad access or ensure election integrity, caving to the “woke” left.

The TRUTH is the law expands early voting & makes voting more secure. He’s sharing a false narrative. Shame!
#WokeCorporateHypocrites

&mdash Senator Roger Wicker (@SenatorWicker) April 1, 2021

“Just how great is this…” commentator and podcast host Stephen L. Miller wrote, sharing an image of a New York Times essay titled “Nike and Coca-Cola Lobby Against Xinjiang Forced Labor Bill,” which details how major companies have been “pressing Congress to alter legislation cracking down on imports of goods made with forced labor from persecuted Muslim minorities in China.”

“The same Democrats who want to tax corporations into bankruptcy, want corporate money out of politics, and called Citizens United ‘unconstitutional’ are now demanding Delta and Coca-Cola spend millions to influence GA politics,” wrote right-wing commentator John Cardillo:

The same Democrats who want to tax corporations into bankruptcy, want corporate money out of politics, and called Citizens United “unconstitutional” are now demanding Delta and Coca-Cola spend millions to influence GA politics.

&mdash John Cardillo (@johncardillo) April 2, 2021

“Leftists want election fraud,” outspoken conservative actor Nick Searcy wrote. “Fraud gives them power they can control.”

“This ‘man’ is either a liar or a fool,” he added, referring to Quincey. “There is NOTHING restrictive about the GA law. Showing an ID to vote is no more oppressive than showing an ID to cash a check. Just stop.”

Leftists want election fraud. Fraud gives them power they can control. This “man” is either a liar or a fool. There is NOTHING restrictive about the GA law. Showing an ID to vote is no more oppressive than showing an ID to cash a check. Just stop. https://t.co/13t5ERBlsE

&mdash Nick Searcy, INTERNATIONAL FILM & TELEVISION STAR (@yesnicksearcy) April 1, 2021

“Coke should relocate to a more suitable state like New York or California,” one Twitter user wrote.

“Dear @CocaCola my family has held Coca-Cola stock for over 90 years. No longer. you trade with China and utter not a word, but let Georgia demand to verify that a voter is who they say they are and you go nuts,” another Twitter user added.

“I know many coke drinkers that vowed to never buy another Coca Cola product as long as they live,” yet another Twitter user wrote. “They said Coca Cola needs to stick to what they do best and stop trying to bully states about new voting laws that’s trying to stop democrat fraud!”

“Remind @CocaCola that asking for an ID is not racist,” another angry user commented. “The annual board meeting for CocaCola required participants to provide photo ID to enter….”

“Fascism in action,” yet another person wrote. “The left has their corporate sponsors speak out over common-sense reform that addresses the methods they used to rig the 2020 election.”

The recent Georgia legislation, which was passed last week and aims to combat voter fraud by implementing identification requirements and limiting ballot drop boxes throughout the state while granting the State Elections Board additional power, has become a source of controversy since its passing.

On Wednesday, ViacomCBS — which owns Paramount Pictures and the CBS network — became the first major Hollywood studio to speak out against Georgia’s voter integrity law, claiming — without citing evidence — that the legislation intended to fight voter fraud actually impedes the “equal right to vote.”

The mass media conglomerate’s criticism came after Delta Air Lines publicly condemned the Georgia legislation. As Breitbart News reported, Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian called the new law “unacceptable” in a memo to employees on Wednesday.


What you should (and should not) cook with Coca-Cola

From more common applications like chocolate cake to intriguing options like marinades for beef and pork, the sweetness and effervescence of the sugary soda enhances a variety of dishes. But here's the thing — it doesn't work everywhere. We've found recipes online for Coke-infused desserts that did nothing to complement the soda, or the dessert, for that matter. With these tests in mind, here are some dos, don'ts and, of course, recipes for incorporating the South's favorite soda in your next meal.

Do: Use it as a braising liquid
Coca-Cola can easily become your new favorite ingredient when you're cooking large cuts of meat. Adding the soda to a traditional braise in place of red wine swaps out some of wine's tannic qualities for a subtle sweetness, which is perfect for cuts like brisket and pot roast. Reduce the cooking liquid after removing the meat to further intensify the spiced flavors of the soda and to create a more refined sauce for your finished dish.

If you’re more a fan of grilled meats (or you're reading this story in warmer weather), dazzle your guests with an unexpected side dish of sweet onions simmered in Coke. The cola adds depth of flavor to the onions themselves, hurries along the caramelization process (hello, sugar), and the acid in the soda even helps the onions maintain some structural integrity. Sounds like the perfect sausage topper to us.
Try it in this recipe
Or this recipe
Do: Use it in savory marinades
Although loaded down with a hefty dose of high fructose corn syrup (or cane sugar if you opt for Mexican Coke), Coca-Cola can, perhaps surprisingly, offer a variety of applications for savory dishes. Because much of this sweetness is balanced out with distinct acidity, Coke can act as a balancing ingredient in many recipes.

This acidity, which comes by way of phosphoric acid, is also a fantastic meat tenderizer. Indeed, most effective marinades for beef, pork and lamb use some type of acid, typically citrus or vinegar, to break down some of the proteins and connective tissues in the meat. In theory, pouring pure Coke over a steak or pork shoulder will cause the proteins to denature and tenderize however, it likely won’t taste very good without a flavorful supporting cast. When Coke is paired with soy sauce, for example, the result is a sweet-salty-umami bomb that tastes like it’s traveling down the road to becoming a fine teriyaki or Korean barbecue sauce.
Try it in this recipe

(But) Don't: Let meat marinate too long
If you're using a lot of Coca-Cola in your marinde (and, hey, you probably are), make sure to watch that soaking time. Any time meat is left in a very acidic marinade for a long time, it will denature and tenderize too much. Ever had mushy grilled pork or beef kebabs? They've likely been sitting in that marinade all day. We advise you max out your marinating time at eight hours.
Do: Use it to glaze chicken wings
Simmering Coca-Cola evaporates all of the excess water in the soda to leave behind a thick, molasses-like syrup. At this stage, the concentrated Coke is practically begging to be used as a glaze on grilled or roasted meats, especially chicken wings. As the soda reduces, adding aromatics like garlic cloves, ginger or jalapeño peppers will add more complexity. Add a few shots of a dark vinegar, such as sherry or balsamic, to give the sauce more zip and better balance. Just be sure to closely monitor the sauce to prevent it from over-reducing or scorching.
Get the recipe

Don't: Use it as a substitute in baking
Online recipes abound for things like Coca-Cola brownies that swap out all of the eggs and butter for soda. While this vegan trick may please butter-eschewing bakers, it is not a wise move. When we tested some of these recipes, they turned out spongy, gummy, and … just weird. The carbonation in the cola certainly leavens the brownies, but there is nothing in there, flavor- or texture-wise that'll tell you, "This here is a brownie." Our general rule is to avoid any recipes that are missing fat, or use Coke as a substitute for any of the liquid ingredients.
Do: Use it in pecan pie
If you have the patience and a large enough pot to reduce a substantial amount of Coca-Cola, you can use the thick reduction in the same manner as corn syrup in the base of a classic pecan pie. It'll make for a totally Southern addition to any Thanksgiving spread, or simply a unique potluck dish.
Try it in this recipe

Don't: Put it in doughnuts (do put it on them)
Coca-Cola doughnuts sound delicious, but they're really, just, not. Adding the soda to the batter produced doughnuts with the mouthfeel of overly dense chocolate cake however, using the soda as part of the glaze worked much better. Even better: Coke's flavor is far more pronounced when you don't cook or bake with it, so simply whisk together powdered sugar and Coca-Cola until you've got a dippable glaze. Top with chopped toasted pecans for added texture.
Try it on top of this recipe
Do: Put it in Coca-Cola cake
In baking, we use Coca-Cola more for its chemical properties than for actual flavor. When the Coke’s acidic ingredients mix with sodium bicarbonate (a.k.a. baking soda), the mixture produces excess carbon dioxide, visible as tiny air bubbles. These bubbles help give cakes and other confections some added leavening. But, as we mentioned above, choose recipes with caution look for cakes and other baked goods with familiar ingredient lists (flour, butter, sugar, baking soda, eggs), such as our Coca-Cola cake recipe. Due in part to the presence of fat coming from butter and oil, the finished cake is fluffy, moist and flavorful.
Get the recipe
Get (another!) recipe

Chef Jeffrey Gardner is a native of Natchez, Miss., and a graduate of Millsaps College and Johnson & Wales University. He lives in Atlanta and has served as sous chef for popular restaurants South City Kitchen Midtown and Alma Cocina. In 2013 he became executive chef for East Cobb restaurant Common Quarter and was named one of ten &ldquoNext Generation of Chefs to Watch&rdquo by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. He has appeared on TV shows including Food Network&rsquos Chopped and Cooking Channel&rsquos How to Live to 100, and also filmed a series of healthy cooking videos with retired pro wrestler and fitness guru Diamond Dallas Page. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling the world with his wife Wendy, watching game shows and &ldquospending all his money on Bruce Springsteen concerts.&rdquo


You'll love these 7 mouthwatering Southern recipes made with Coca-Cola

It's surprisingly easy for Coca-Cola to be used in both sweet and savory Southern recipes. The soda pairs perfectly with all kinds of dishes that complement its bittersweet, slightly acidic flavors. Read along for a few of our favorites — try them as soon as you can get yourself to the nearest store a pick up a bottle.

Lauded by SNL’s fictitious Atlanta resident Buford Calloway as “sweet Dixie Champagne,” Coca-Cola is more than just a tasty Southern beverage. It is the world’s most famous brand, with syrupy and effervescent qualities that lend themselves to a wide variety of culinary applications, such as the recipes below.

But before you get cooking, we suggest seeking out I suggest Mexican Coke. Its sweetness comes from cane sugar, rather than high fructose corn syrup, making it closer to the Coca-Cola flavor of your childhood, no matter what region you’re from.

Coca-Cola Braised Beef Brisket
This Southern-inspired brisket recipe is perfect for for the holidays or any other time you need some slow-cooked comfort fare. Indeed, brisket is a cut of beef that’s meant to be cooked low and slow, and by doing that in a bath of Coca-Cola, you'll be pairing the salty-savory meat against the sweetness of the Coke, vinegar and sweet onions. Pro-tip: If you want a richer sauce, remove the brisket once cooked and reduce braising liquid until thickened to your liking.
Get the recipe
Coca-Cola Cake
In addition to harnessing the sweetness of Coca-Cola, we can also capitalize on the carbonation, particularly in baked goods. A true wonder of the Southern pantry, this chocolate Coca-Cola cake combines the soda with the gentle acidity of buttermilk to activate the leavening power of baking soda. When mixed with the butter (please don’t use margarine), oil, and marshmallows, the result is a soft, moist, and fluffy chocolate cake. I also love how the recipe doubles down on the Coca-Cola in the frosting however, don’t feel limited to use this icing. A simple chocolate or caramel ganache, or even a schmear of chocolate mousse would all be fantastic frostings for this delicious cake.
Get the recipe

Coca-Cola Glazed Wings
Balance is the name of the game with these sweet and savory chicken wings. Here, the Coca-Cola is reduced to a syrupy glaze, but the additions of fresh lime juice and jalapeño peppers bring spice and bright acidity to the party. With all the sweetness from the brown sugar and Coca-Cola, be sure to add more salt than you think you need, or better yet, add a half cup of soy sauce to the mixture before heating. Be sure to closely monitor the glaze as it reduces. If the sugar becomes overly caramelized and concentrated, the final product will either be too thick to glaze the wings, or bitter from that burnt sugar flavor. Just enough viscosity to lightly coat the back of a spoon will be perfect for nicely glazed chicken wings. To further brighten the finished sauce, add either the juice of one lime or two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar.
Get the recipe

Coca-Cola Glazed Ham
In this recipe, the Coca-Cola works not only as part of the glaze, but also as the basting liquid for the salty ham. I would agree with Virginia Willis’ preference for Dijon mustard (or even Creole mustard) over yellow ballpark mustard: the flavors and just seem to meld more seamlessly. Once the ham has finished cooking, I like the idea of taking the juices from the pan and reducing them in a pot until a light glaze has formed. Your finished dish will have just a touch more finesse than simply serving the straight basting liquid, though the latter is never a bad option. While you can always serve the ham as a centerpiece, those who prepare this ham for the sole purpose of sandwiches are truly the angels among us.
Get the recipe

Bourbon and Coke Baked Beans
Baked beans normally start gracing tables as the cooler weather turns decidedly hot but honestly, they're great any time of year. Your guests may not be able to identify the "secret ingredients" in these baked beans, but they'll love to learn that bourbon and Coca-Cola are in there. Turn it into a main course by serving with cornbread.
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Coca-Cola Sloppy Joes
A good ol' can of Coke sure comes in handy when you're trying to figure out what to do with a package of ground beef on a weeknight. With the flick of a pop top, it adds a caramel sweetness and peppery spice to a sloppy Joe mixture that also contains ground beef or turkey, onion and barbecue sauce. Not spicy enough for your taste? Shake in some hot sauce. Round out the meal with coleslaw — either from the deli or homemade. Serve it on the side or, like we did, inside the bun with the meat mixture. We don't call them sloppy for nothin.'
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Coca Cola-Glazed Baby Back Ribs
There is almost nothing better in this world than barbecue pork ribs. Not only is this cut of meat generally affordable, but it is also packed with flavor. While there are numerous ways different Southern cities like to prepare they're baby backs, we're partial to this recipe, which calls for a sweet glaze made in part by activating the sugars in Coca-Cola. This recipe also calls for a nice helping of pimenton picante which is a hot Hungarian paprika. It can be found at farmers markets and other specialty markets.
Get the recipe

Photo (coca-cola cake): Kate Williams

Ryan Shepard is the editor-in-chief at Southern Kitchen. Though originally from Los Angeles, she has lived in Atlanta since early 2017 and cannot imagine calling any other city home (except maybe New Orleans). Before joining Southern Kitchen's staff, Ryan worked on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on public policy issues. When she's not at work, she enjoys hunting down the best Mexican food in the city and drinking whiskey, obviously.

Chef Jeffrey Gardner is a native of Natchez, Miss., and a graduate of Millsaps College and Johnson & Wales University. He lives in Atlanta and has served as sous chef for popular restaurants South City Kitchen Midtown and Alma Cocina. In 2013 he became executive chef for East Cobb restaurant Common Quarter and was named one of ten &ldquoNext Generation of Chefs to Watch&rdquo by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. He has appeared on TV shows including Food Network&rsquos Chopped and Cooking Channel&rsquos How to Live to 100, and also filmed a series of healthy cooking videos with retired pro wrestler and fitness guru Diamond Dallas Page. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling the world with his wife Wendy, watching game shows and &ldquospending all his money on Bruce Springsteen concerts.&rdquo


Hy-Vee Recipes and Ideas

Marinating steaks in a cola-based marinade adds a touch of sweetness and will give your meat a nice caramelized char once it hits the grill.

Recipe Tags

Servings and Ingredients

Things To Grab

Directions

Marinate the meat for about 30 minutes prior to grilling.

Combine Coca-Cola, oil and steak seasoning in a large resealable plastic bag. Add steaks and onion. Marinate in a refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Remove steaks and onion from marinade discard marinade.

Grill steaks and onions over direct medium heat with the lid closed as much as possible. Grill 16 to 20 minutes, turning once, until steaks reach desired doneness and onions are tender and charred. Remove from grill and let steak rest 5 minutes before serving.


Gatorade, Lemon-Lime

Shutterstock

Vanessa Rissetto MS, RD, CDN, co-founder of Culina Health, says that although Gatorade serves a purpose for hydration, it also has a fair amount of sugar. And for athletes, more sugar equals more cramping. "[I often] hear of marathon runners who say they have a lot of GI distress when they start running and it's exacerbated when they drink [Gatorade]," she says. Rissetto adds that the zero-calorie versions aren't ideal either because they contain artificial sweeteners.

More sugar than an energy drink? No, thank you! Marketed as a sports drink, Gatorade has 34 grams of sugar in a bottle. Cut the portion way down, or rehydrate with water and refuel with whole fruits and vegetables.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 ½ cups miniature marshmallows
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 cup cola-flavored carbonated beverage
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 6 tablespoons cola-flavored carbonated beverage
  • 4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 cup chopped pecans

Combine flour and white sugar in mixing bowl. Heat 1 cup butter, 3 tablespoons cocoa, and 1 cup cola soft drink to boiling and pour over the flour and sugar. Mix thoroughly.

Add buttermilk, eggs, baking soda, vanilla, and marshmallows and mix well.

Bake in a prepared 9 by 13 inch pan for 40 minutes at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

While still hot, frost with Coco Cola Frosting: Combine 1/2 cup butter or margarine, 2 tablespoons cocoa and 6 tablespoons cola soft drink and heat to boiling. Pour over 4 cups confectioners' sugar and mix well. Mix in chopped nuts and spread over hot cake.


How To Make Coca-Cola Chicken.

Coca-Cola Chicken is another version of stewed chicken. It is similar to Jamaican Brown Stewed Chicken.

A co-worker of mine put me on to this unique way of cooking chicken. It was a strange idea at first, but the foodie in me, could not resist experimenting with this new recipe.

I have added my own twist on her Spanish style way of making her own coca cola chicken. I always taunted her that my coca cola chicken is way better.

Least to say, this is a very unique way to stew meats. I have cooked beef, steak and pork in Coca-Cola Soda and it has turned out very tender with meat falling off the bone.

Jamaican brown stewed chicken is simply browning the chicken in oil and stewing it in brown sauce.

Most people pre-season their chicken with “browning” (a caramelized sugar sauce) prior to cooking. Traditionally, Jamaicans usually brown or cook sugar in hot oil until it reaches dark brown caramel. The chicken is then added to oil mixture and stirred to coat the meat. Hence, the name Jamaican brown stew chicken.

Fay DeLeon in on her channel Cook Like a Jamaican gave a great video presentation o how to cook Jamaican stewed chicken.

Cooking chicken in coca-cola follows the same principle. The sugary content of the coca-cola reduces to a rich brown caramelized sauce.

Because of coca-cola’s acidity, the muscle fibers and bones of chicken or red meats become quickly tenderized.

The unique flavor and sugary content of coca-cola adds a hint of sweetness and richness to the chicken dish. The sugars from onions and carrots releases their juices and later reabsorb the coca cola sauce in a love triangle.

Coca-Cola chicken is simply a 3 step method. It’s quick and easy meal idea. Serve over a bowl of rice and you have yourself a delicious finger licking meal. Let’s explore the recipe ahead.


You might already know that Dasani water is owned by Coke. But electrolyte-boosted Smartwater is, too.

Shutterstock / Sheila Fitzgerald

Vitaminwater may be closer to juice than it is to water, but Coca-Cola has done a good job making this fruit-flavored drink seem healthy. Spoiler: It's not—Vitaminwater is one of the 40 Drinks You Should Never Drink After 40.

Zico Coconut Water/Facebook

Zico is one of the most prominent coconut water brands out there. And it, too, is owned by Coca-Cola.


Recipe for Pomegranate Shrub

3-4 large pomegranates
1 3/4 cups of sugar
1 cup Cider Vinegar

1. Line a colander with cheesecloth and place it over a clean glass (or other non reactive) bowl. Roll the pomegranates on the counter to loosen the seeds, then cut them into quarters. Invert the quarter and pop the seeds out into the colander.

2. Pick out any of the white pith that fell into the seeds as it will lend a bitter note to the finished product if you don't. Pull the ends of the cheesecloth and squeeze the pomegranate seeds as hard as you can. Keep squeezing and twisting until you have only the inner kernels left in the cloth. Throw that away. You should have about 2 cups of liquid.

3. Mix the liquid with the sugar (use more if you like it sweeter). Stir to try to dissolve as much of the sugar as possible.

4. Add the vinegar to the mixture, pour the whole into a clean bottle, cap it securely and shake it. Place it in the refrigerator and let it sit for 2 weeks. Shake it whenever you think of it.

5. Finally, uncork it and give it a sniff. It will smell very vinegary. Mix a small amount with seltzer water and taste it. It will seem extremely sour to the modern palate but mixed with seltzer or vodka in the right proportions, it is indeed, very refreshing. If you find it too sour, simply add more sugar and let it sit for another day.

Note: To make this recipe with any other fruit, just chop up the fruit very coarsely, mix it with the sugar and let the mixture sit on the counter or in the fridge for several hours until the juice oozes out of the fruit. (Blemished fruit is great for this!). Then, strain the fruit through a sieve and mix the resulting sugary juice with the vinegar. Some people cook the fruit for a time with the sugar to produce the syrup. Both methods work perfectly well.


Watch the video: Experiment!! Mu0026M CANDY vs Coca Cola, Mtn Dew, Yedigün, Powerade, Pepsi and Mentos in toilet (June 2022).