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Bananas With Edible Peels Are Here, and They’re Wild

Bananas With Edible Peels Are Here, and They’re Wild


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We’re not monkeying around. The person snacking doesn’t peel back the leathery skin or scope out a nearby trash can — instead, they simply pick up the fruit, stick it in their mouth, and bite right through the banana’s flesh.

Sound a-peel-ing?

The bananas are called “the Mongee” — pronounced mon-gay, like monkey but with a G — and you can only find them in Japan. “Mongee” is Japanese slang for “incredible,” and we must say we agree.

They’re created without the use of genetic modification, but rather by employing what the farmers call the “freeze thawing awakening method.” This method involves growing banana trees in a chilly climate of negative 75 degrees Fahrenheit (that’s really cold), then thawing the frozen crop and replanting them. The new trees birth fast-growing, plush bananas with edible peels.

This all makes sense, but we have a few questions. One, what happens to the brown part at the bottom, what some may call the “butt” of the banana? Do you eat the banana butt, too?

Two, how do people feel eating this abnormal creation in public? Some aren’t so keen on the idea.

“I don’t want to watch someone eating that,” one disturbed Daily Meal editor complained.

We were additionally intrigued by how the peel might taste. According to those who have tried the crop, the peel is mostly tasteless. Some say it possesses a mild tropical flavor, similar to a pineapple.

The peel’s texture is allegedly tolerable, as well, mimicking the thin feel of a lettuce leaf.

On top of the enjoyable, albeit awkward, eating experience, the bananas are filled with ripe nutrition. D & T Farm claims that the banana peel is an excellent source of vitamin B6, magnesium, and tryptophan. Tryptophan is the amino acid rumored to make you sleepy, which can help trigger serotonin and make you happier.

The sugar rush you get after eating one might boost your mood, as well — the bananas have an average of 25 grams of natural sugar, making them much sweeter than the usual bananas with 18 grams. But natural sugars are okay — and the extra nutrients you’re getting from the peel are a bonus. If you’re looking for a more nutritious fruit, here are 7 of the most nutritious fruits you can eat!


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.


People around the world are eating banana peels because they know something that Westerners do not

If you live in the US, you're probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

While a banana's flesh is soft and sweet, the skin is thick, fibrous, and slightly bitter. To eat the peel, you can either blend it into smoothies or fry, bake, or boil them for at least 10 minutes. Heat breaks down the skin's fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest.

Also, the riper you allow the banana to get, the thinner and sweeter the peel becomes. That's because of a natural plant hormone called ethylene that fruits release as they ripen.

Ethylene interacts with the sugars and fiber in the banana skin, changing complex sugars into simple sugars and breaking down pectin, a form of fiber in bananas that keeps them stiff. That's why the older your banana is, the flimsier it feels. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.



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