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Taste-Off: Pasta vs. Pasta

Taste-Off: Pasta vs. Pasta

Courtesy of Maryse Chevriere

Einkorn Pasta

As the line blurs between “health” food and “regular” food (isn’t it cool to eat healthy these days?), producers are on the lookout for the next great thing. Einkorn is one such example. An ancient grain, first grown by man over 12,000 years ago, einkorn has nearly been forgotten due to its low yield and other characteristics that make it unsuitable for mass-processing. However, this grain is a nutritional powerhouse that I think will give the other whole wheat, spelt, or farro pastas on the market a run for their money.

Compared side by side with generic whole wheat pasta, einkorn pasta is a richer source of protein, fiber, and a variety of vitamins and minerals like thiamin and lutein than both whole wheat and regular pastas. Like whole-wheat pasta, it has both the bran and germ, resulting in higher fiber count. And many know that more fiber and less processing means a lower glycemic index, which is better for us and and our waistlines.

We will let the facts speak for themselves, but in order to properly compare the two pastas yourself -- by tasting -- you can do as I did, and take the pasta to the kitchen. Pair the Einkorn pasta with something simple, like butter and Parmigiano Reggiano or a parsley-walnut pesto. Or you can choose a chunky sauce to complement the chewy noodles, like the Tomato Vegetable Sauce with Sausage. Whole wheat pasta is a versatile alternative to "regular" pasta. It goes well in cold vegetable pasta salads, sesame noodle salads, or with a Creamy Goat Cheese Sauce with Beets and Beet Greens.

Jovial Whole-Grain Einkorn Pasta

  • Price: about $3.39 - $3.69 for a 12 ounce box
  • Calories: 200 calories per 2 ounce serving
  • Protein: 9 grams per 2 ounce serving
  • Fiber: 4 grams per 2 ounce serving
  • Ingredients: 100% organic whole-grain einkorn, water
  • Source: Jovial Foods; click here to buy.
  • Cooking Time: About 14 minutes for 4 servings
  • Appearance: A slightly reddish tone; a darker brown color than whole wheat pasta
  • Taste: A little chewier than standard whole-wheat pasta, which, when served with a chunky sauce, is nice. Has a distinctive sweet and nutty flavor that makes eating the pasta alone not so plain.

Bionaturae Whole Durum Wheat Pasta

  • Price: $3.49 for a 16 ounce bag
  • Calories: 180 calories per 2 ounce serving
  • Protein: 7 grams protein per 2 ounce serving
  • Fiber: 6g fiber per 2 ounce serving
  • Ingredients: Organic whole durum wheat
  • Source: Bionaturae; click here to find it.
  • Cooking Time: About 10 minutes for 4 servings
  • Appearance: A light brown color with darker flecks of brown.
  • Taste: Less chewy than the einkorn pasta, but chewier than standard pasta. Unlike plain pasta, there is a definite nut flavor to whole wheat pasta, not as much as einkorn. Want to buy it?

This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.


This Chickpea Pasta Is Actually Delicious

I'm sort of against the idea of pasta substitutions. If you really want pasta, have it. If you're trying to avoid it, eat one of the many delicious foods in the universe that aren't pasta. And yet, there's an exception to my rule. It's Banza.

Banza—if you haven't had it—is pasta made of chickpeas. (Yes, everything is made of chickpeas now. No, I don't know why.) And unlike many of the red lentil and black bean pasta substitutes out there, it's really good. It's not gummy or overly soft. Nor is it stringy or tough. It holds up to being boiled in water better than other bean pastas, maintaining the bite of an al dente noodle. (Here's a caveat: only buy the small shapes. The spaghetti and long-strand varieties of Banza get soft and fall apart. Stick with the elbows, penne, rigatoni, rotini, etc.)

Even though chickpea pasta doesn't contain any gluten, which usually makes sauce adhere better, pasta sauce clings nicely to Banza and you can still use the starchy pasta water you've cooked it in to emulsify and thicken a sauce. (Maybe this is related to the magical properties of aquafaba. Just speculating!) All that is to say, Banza is the best non-pasta pasta, because it behaves like real pasta.

And yet, to contradict myself, I think the best way to think about Banza—in order to really enjoy it—is to think of it not as pasta, but rather as its own distinct entity. Its flavor, after all, is different from white-flour pasta. Different, but good. It's got a distinct nuttiness to it—the kind you always want from whole wheat pasta, but better because it doesn't have whole wheat pasta's grainy, tough texture. You want to use Banza in situations that highlight this nutty flavor. It's not the best with tomato-based sauces, but it really shines when you use it in a pasta dish that includes a lot of vegetables and sharp cheeses.

Think: my all-time favorite pasta, my colleague Anna's carbonara with lots of cabbage and mushrooms. Or, this lemony pasta made with heaps of arugula, and chickpeas themselves to match the flavor of the pasta. It's also excellent with this broccoli bolognese recipe. In these sorts of vegetable-forward dishes, chickpea pasta brings a welcome rich, complex flavor.

Banza recently came out with a rice substitute made of chickpeas. Epi staffers have tried it, with mixed reviews. Personally, I think you're better off eating real brown rice, a food that's nutritionally valuable on its own. (The instant mac and cheese they sell, however, totally slaps. It would be a great higher-protein alternative for kids.)

Which brings me to this question: Why eat Banza? It's lower-carb than traditional pasta—though it's certainly not devoid of carbohydrates. It contains a lot more fiber than white-flour pasta, and it's much higher in protein, too. It's gluten-free, of course. I guess it's fair to say that I keep these things in mind when I choose to eat Banza over regular pasta sometimes. But really, I think the nuttiness and the appealing bite in the texture make Banza worth eating for its own merit. So, get yourself some and start bragging to everyone you know about your increased daily fiber consumption.