New recipes

Spritz O’Clock

Spritz O’Clock


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  1. Home
  2. Best Recipes

4.5

2 ratings

August 10, 2017

By

Daisy Nichols

It's always spritz o'clock somewhere

This recipe, courtesy of Santa Margherita, is full of flavor from passion fruit purée and aromatic orange flower water. Make this for a fruity and light cocktail with a perfect balance between sweet and bitter.

1

Servings

63

Calories Per Serving

Ingredients

  • 1 Ounce Aperol
  • 1/2 Ounce vodka
  • 1/2 Ounce orange juice
  • Dash of passion fruit purée
  • 5 drops of orange flower water

Directions

Build over ice and top with Santa Margherita Sparkling Rosé.

Garnish with an orange wheel and spray of orange blossom.

Nutritional Facts

Servings1

Calories Per Serving63

Sugar1gN/A

Protein0.1g0.3%

Carbs2g1%

Vitamin A1µgN/A

Vitamin C7mg12%

Calcium4mgN/A

Folate (food)5µgN/A

Folate equivalent (total)5µg1%

Iron0.1mg0.8%

Magnesium5mg1%

Niacin (B3)0.1mg0.5%

Phosphorus9mg1%

Potassium57mg2%

Sodium2mgN/A

Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

Tags


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Spritz O’Clock

Book Review by Carolyn Price

Looking for some new recipes for your virtual cocktail happy hour? Open your fridge, grab a beer and your favorite juice and try out these three recipes from Camp Cocktails : Easy, Fun, and Delicious Drinks for the Great Outdoors. Excerpted from pages 82-85.

Mixing with Beer

The Radler, a combination of beer with fruit soda or lemonade, was dreamed up in Germany

in the early 1900s as a refreshing drink for parched cyclists. If you’re wondering what the difference between a radler and a shandy is, well, there isn’t much of one.

Radler is the German term, and shandy is the British one (though shandies began as a beer and ginger ale combination and gradually wandered their way into the beer and lemonade camp from there).

Light and thirst quenching, radlers are perfectly suited to spritz o’clock. Many people make their radlers (and shandies) with equal parts beer and fruit juice but try them in varying proportions based on the fruit juice you’re using.

Strawberry Lemonade Radler

10 ounces (45 ml) lemon juice

2 ounces (60 ml) soda water

8 ounces (240 ml) German wheat beer, chilled

In a large cup, vigorously smash the strawberries and sugar together.

Blend the strawberries into as much of a purée as possible by hand. Once you have a berry sauce, stir in the lemon juice and soda water. Top with the beer.

Tropical Radler

3 ounces (90 ml) pineapple juice

8 ounces (240 ml) citrusy India pale ale (IPA), chilled

Add the pineapple juice to a cup, pour the beer over, and enjoy!

Beermosa

6 ounces (180 ml) fresh orange juice

6 ounces (180 ml) Belgian wheat beer, chilled

Orange wedge, for garnish (optional)

Add the orange juice to a cup and pour the beer over it. Garnish with an orange wedge, if desired.

Canned Cocktails

It’s not just beer that’s available in cans these days. Clever distillers have started to make canned cocktails in an increasingly diverse array of flavors and can sizes. It’s a way to have a perfectly balanced cocktail with the ease of cracking open a beer, so what’s not to love?

Look for canned cocktails made with high-quality ingredients, just as you would use if making a cocktail yourself.


Watch the video: Spritz OClock at Ristorante da Giovanni Taormina, Sicily (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Jamal

    Jokes aside!

  2. Maccoll

    Analogues are available?

  3. Yasin

    What necessary words ... Great, an excellent idea

  4. Cuthbeorht

    It is no more than conditionality

  5. Brook

    I suggest to see the site that there are many articles on the subject.

  6. Canh

    It is interesting. Prompt, where to me to learn more about it?

  7. Kajijar

    In it all business.



Write a message