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Science Figures Out Why Guys Eat Fewer Vegetables

Science Figures Out Why Guys Eat Fewer Vegetables


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Psychologists investigate planned behavior and eating habits

Wikimedia/Julian

Men are less likely than women to eat their vegetables, and a recent study may have finally figured out why.

According to the study, men were less positive about fruits and vegetables in general, and they did not tend to believe in the health benefits of fruits and vegetables as much as the surveyed women did.

“Men don’t believe as strongly as women that fruit and vegetable consumption is an important part of maintaining health,” said researcher John A. Updegraff of Kent State University.

The research goes along with the theory of planned behavior, which predicts behavior based on attitude and perception of control. In addition to showing that men on average had a less positive attitude towards vegetables, the study also revealed that men felt less control over their ability to eat them. According to My Health News Daily, the study showed that men reported a lack of confidence in their ability to eat healthful foods, especially when they were tired, hungry, or around people eating junk food.

According to Updegraff, the study hints at possible ways to get guys to eat more vegetables.

“What might work best is teaching men ways to take control over their fruit and vegetable consumption,” he said.

While the preparation of vegetables may seem daunting to neophytes, it’s actually quite easy. Check out our best vegetable recipes to see how.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.


Getting in a variety of vegetables each day lowers your risk for being overweight or obese. One study published in 2015 in the journal Plos Medicine found higher intakes of non-starchy vegetables like cauliflower and leafy greens are associated with lower body weights. One reason is the fiber in vegetables fills you up without the extra calories. Starchy veggies however, such as corn, peas and potatoes, had the opposite effect. So if healthy weight management is your goal, try boosting your intake of fiber-rich non-starchy vegetables (greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, asparagus, and many more).

Veggies are rich in fiber (which helps lower blood cholesterol) and free from saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Fresh veggies are low in sodium, as well (sodium can contribute to high blood pressure when consumed in excess). Therefore, boosting your veggie intake can help lower your risk for heart disease, especially if you eat vegetables in place of not-so-healthy foods. The World Health Organization confirms boosting veggie intake helps lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease and stroke.