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Eating My Way Through Lima, Peru

Eating My Way Through Lima, Peru


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There are few people who can say they were lured to the far corners of the earth by marinated fish and egg-white infused cocktails.

I can.

Knowing nothing of the city, or of what to expect there, I traveled alone, on a whim, to Lima, Peru, to feast on ceviche and sip Pisco Sours incessantly for three short days.

As a veteran “pescatarian” (for more than ten years I’d eaten no land animals) ceviche made its way down my esophagus a couple times in the past, both at home (thanks to my mother’s obsession with cooking international cuisine) and at random Latin American cafés across the U.S. I’d tried my first and only Pisco Sour on one cool summer evening in Manhattan at the New York City Food Film Festival in 2009. I loved them both. So, after learning that ceviche is the national dish of Peru and Pisco its national beverage, I stared at an incredible $250 roundtrip airfare deal online thinking to myself, what good is a feast if not devoured in its place of birth? Do we not dream of slurping handmade pasta with a fine Sangiovese in Italy, or indulging in a decadent tarte tatin with champagne in France?

So off I went to Lima, prepared to thrive on a diet of every sea creature alive swimming in a flavorful brine with a sizeable glass of Pisco Sour at its side at all times. What I didn’t expect was to be sucked into the gastronomic Carnival that is Lima’s culinary scene and spat out a full-fledged omnivore. Lima will do this to you. Let me explain…

I began my trip with a ceviche cooking class with Magical Cusco Tours. Three rounds of ceviche into the one-on-one with the executive chef of El Seniorio de Sulco, I was surprised to be faced with a traditional Peruvian meal that included Lomo Saltado (seared strips of beef served with frites) and causa limena (chicken salad sandwiched between two cakes of cold mashed potato). Not wanting to insult the chef’s hard work, I savored every bite of the seared steak and every morsel of the causa. Almost mockingly, the meal ended with suspiro a la limena, a rich custard topped with meringue that literally translates to mean “a Limean sigh.”

Feeling guilty that I’d veered off my intended path of fish and cocktails, I traversed through Miraflores to Café Haiti, whose traditional trout ceviche brought me quite close to tears and, had it not been for the fine people seated around me and a heavy dose of pride, I’d have licked the bowl clean. Instead, I ordered a second dish and sipped my Pisco Sour as I waited.

The following day, a visit to Huaca Pucllana restaurant situated amidst the city’s ancient pyramid ruins provided the perfect backdrop for the saffron-yellow aji de gallina — a creamy chicken stew served over rice topped with one half of a seemingly out-of-place boiled egg and an even more awkwardly poised, solitary black olive.

Though delicious, aji de gallina has a way of sitting with you for the rest of the day. Concerned about my ability to consume ceviche later that evening, I decided to embark on a city tour by foot, in hopes that the “full” feeling would wear off quickly. Two hours of walking and two taxi rides later, I found myself in the Bohemian neighborhood of Barranco, faced with yet another gastronomic surprise. The Festival del Sabor Barranquino was underway and there were juicy pieces of grilled, white corn calling my name. Unable to resist, I succumbed to the smallest piece on the grill, but found myself defenseless against the little old ladies hustling samples of their tortas and puddings in hopes that I’d relinquish all self control (and concerns about my waistline) and buy something. Sample — I did. But purchase — I did not. There was ceviche to be had.

Somewhere between waddling back to my hotel in Miraflores and making a pit stop at Café Haiti, it occurred to me that I couldn’t leave Lima without dining at a Chifa, a Peruvian Chinese food restaurant. The Chifa I sought out the following day — Chifa Men Wha — provided excellent sanctuary after a lengthy tour of the Museo Arqueológico Rafael Larco Herrera, home to more than 45,000 pre-Columbian artifacts. The Pisco Sour somehow heightened the Asian flavors in the traditional Chinese dishes that had been infused with Peruvian spices.

By the time my stay in Lima was nearing its end, my priorities (and taste buds) had shifted. My hankering for ceviche and Pisco Sours had transcended into a love of all the flavors of Lima and a desire to taste the world.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


A Food Tour Through Lima, Peru.

The email read, “Meet at the door of Starbucks Cafe in the Barranco “parque municipal.” We arrived 10 minutes early and took a seat on the nearest park bench to watch the people around us. There were young children running across the grass with balloons and painted faces, a table of older men playing cards nearby, and a mother feeding her young daughter blue and pink cotton candy.

A few minutes before 4pm we headed for the door of Starbucks where a young Peruvian woman named Luc greeted us, standing beside two 20-something Germans who would be joining us for the tour. A simple search for “things to do in Lima, Peru” on TripAdvisor, introduced us to this four-hour food tour of Lima put on by Food Walking Tour Peru.

They have several different tour options on their website but we opted for the Barranco tour, a nearby Bohemian neighborhood next to where we were staying in Miraflores. For $35 USD each, the tour includes all food, drinks and desserts served at five stops, a 15-minute stop to watch the sunset over the ocean, a choice from the list of 8 craft beers in an internationally awarded local brewery of the neighborhood, and a local, knowledgeable guide. I can tell you now, it was well worth the price.

As requested by the company, I am not going to mention where we ate, but I will introduce you to the dish of each location and a bit about what makes it a Peruvian speciality. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me directly or to the tour company. (Note: This is not a sponsored post, I am just a happy paying customer).

Meal 1: Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish served cold as an appetizer. We were offered a variety of three types to try – octopus, tuna, and scallops…all three were incredible. The causa is made spicy by mixing with ají pepper, a basic ingredient, used often in Peruvian food.

The most folkloric version of the history of “Causa Peruana” says that a nun from Lima had to feed a battalion of soldiers and she was asked with very short notice. So she used what there was available and because they were celebrating the Peruvian Independence Day, it was named “causa” (cause).

Meal 2: Anticucho

A popular and inexpensive dish that originated in the Andes during the pre-Columbian era, Anticucho translates to mean cut stew meat. This particular dish is made from beef heart (anticuchos de corazón) and served alongside boiled potatoes and corn.

A good move on Luc’s part, she had us try the dish before she told us what it was so we weren’t turned off. Surprisingly, delicious!

Meal 3: Pan con chicharron

In Peru, chicharron refers to succulent pork, which is then sliced and served on a roll with fried sweet potato, onions, parsley, and a variation of salsa or mayo. It’s a common street food that can be found all over Lima and based off the varieties I saw, will keep you full all day long (they are huge!).

The sandwich offers the perfect blend of savory and spicy and it’s so well-loved in these parts, you’ll often see locals enjoying it for breakfast, as well as, a late night snack after the bars close.

Snack 4: Emoliente con aloe vera, chia seed, & flax seed

This was my favorite stop along the way because it addition to being local and authentic, it offers a wide array of health benefits. Emoliente is an herbal tea popular with most all Peruvians that is sold by street vendors around the country. Peruvians believe it to have healing and protective powers, and when you hear what’s it in, you’ll understand why.

While recipes vary from vendor to vendor, the herbal tea can include any, if not all, of the following:

  • Aloe vera: To sooth the digestive tract and counter the affects of eating spicy food daily.
  • Horsetail: Has diuretic properties (great for constipated travelers).
  • Boldo: Supports digestion (and a hangover).
  • Cats claw: May help with cancer treatment, inflammation, & viral infection.
  • Alfalfa juice: Rich in vitamins and minerals.
  • Cinnamon: Source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Bee Pollen: Increases circulation, eases tension, and reduces environmental allergies.
  • Honey: Contains disease-preventing and disease-fighting agents.

The consistency is almost gooey and you need to use your lip along the edge of the cup to cut the mixture so you can swallow (think of the consistency of chia seed pudding, but a bit more watery).

Sounds weird…but it’s wonderful! And your stomach will feel like a million bucks after.

Dessert 5: Picarones

A type of doughnut brought to the colonies by Spanish conquistadors, picarones are made with squash and sweet potato, and drizzled with honey or spiced syrup.

If your travels find you in Lima, Peru, I hope you enjoy the food as much as we did! Happy travels.


Watch the video: Tour of Miraflores - PERUVIAN FOOD LUNCH, Ocean Views + Great Coffee! Lima, Peru (May 2022).