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Dean & Deluca Pumps the Brakes on Plans to Expand

Dean & Deluca Pumps the Brakes on Plans to Expand


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The food retailer has decided to refocus on their existing stores

Dreamstime

Expensive New York-founded, Kansas-based food retailer Dean & Deluca’s parent brand, Pace Development, has decided not to expand to more locations.

Dean & Deluca is backing out of leases signed for three different Manhattan locations and one Texas store. The upscale grocery store will not be moving into storefronts in the former Spice Market eatery in the Meatpacking District, in the Trump Organization’s 40 Wall Street, in the Graybar Building at 420 Lexington Ave., or into a planned facility in suburban Dallas.

The high-end grocer, founded in New York but now based in Kansas, is known for selling an assortment of New York classics and luxe goodies like tins of $35 black and white cookies, $350 Siberian caviar, and $55 lobster mac and cheese.

Pace Development Corp., which currently owns the brand, said in a statement that they plan on focusing their efforts on the brand’s existing stores. “The company is investing in the strategic reassessment required to solve legacy issues and the current challenges that are facing brands in the retail sector,” Pace wrote.

Disappointed that they won’t be expanding more closely to you at the moment? Luckily, the grocery retailer is still one of the 16 best mail-order food companies.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Dallas ISD's struggling schools made major gains. Then the money went away.

Second-grade teacher Stacy Ray helps students with their classwork at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District officials put hundreds of thousands of additional dollars into seven ACE campuses, which immediately showed significant academic and behavioral gains.

Linda Darden leads her students in a song to help them remember a lesson during fifth-grade reading classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. Umphrey Lee received a B grade under the state’s academic accountability system in 2018-19, its first year after losing extensive ACE supports.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. Umphrey Lee maintained its strong academic gains in 2018-19, its first year without extensive ACE supports, but other campuses experienced significant regression.

Fourth-grade teacher Ariel Taylor, left, hugs her students as they arrive for class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE. District leaders replaced nearly all staff members and offered financial incentives to attract highly-rated educators to long-struggling schools under the ACE model.

Fifth-grade science teacher Allison Varner, right, interacts with students during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of seven schools that participated in the district’s first year of a signature campus turnaround initiative known as Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE.

Students line up in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which had long ranked among the lowest-performing in the district until the Accelerating Campus Excellence initiative started in 2015-16.

Students raise their hands to answer questions during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, which received extensive supports for three years and produced significant gains during that time.

Students raise their hands to answer questions in Courtney Johnson's fourth grade math class at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE.

Principal Stephanie McCloud is pictured in a hallway during classes at the Dallas ISD's Umphrey Lee Elementary School, one of the district's signature turnaround schools involved in the improvement initiative known as ACE. McCloud previously served as an assistant principal at Umphrey Lee before taking the lead role in 2018-19, which administrators cited as a reason why the campus maintained its academic gains despite losing extensive financial supports that year.

After three straight years of remarkable academic growth at Billy Earl Dade Middle School, the long-struggling Dallas ISD campus tumbled back to the bottom of the district in 2018-19.

Dade&rsquos fall came after its principal received a promotion, more than half of its teaching staff left and Dallas leaders pulled money spent on the campus through the district&rsquos school turnaround program, Accelerating Campus Excellence, ACE for short.

&ldquoIt was amazing, really storybook for me,&rdquo Edward Turner, a longtime south Dallas education advocate, said of the initial results. &ldquoBut at the end of the day, it&rsquos about how are we going to sustain these programs and provide equitable resources to these schools.&rdquo

Dade and six other chronically low-rated Dallas schools mostly sparkled during their three years under ACE, with test scores rising and student discipline rates falling. In turn, state lawmakers and education leaders heralded Dallas&rsquo model as evidence that all students from poverty can perform at high levels when taught by strong educators in well-funded schools.

An analysis of academic and staffing data, however, shows the first schools weaned off ACE investments posted mixed results in 2018-19, their first year without the added support. The outcomes suggest districts attempting to mimic Dallas&rsquo much-lauded success &mdash including Aldine ISD and eight others already implementing similar initiatives &mdash could struggle to maintain high performance without consistent funding or tweaks to the model.

While three of Dallas&rsquo initial ACE schools maintained relatively strong academic performance, three campuses received D or F grades under the state&rsquos academic accountability system and grappled with significant staff turnover. Dallas invested nearly $1 million per year in some of its first ACE campuses, part of which paid for financial incentives given to high-performing educators.

&ldquoWe saw some great things happening from the first year out of ACE, and we saw some hard lessons for us,&rdquo said Shatara Stokes, Dallas&rsquo director of school leadership over the initiative. &ldquoFundamentally, the thought was we had made tons and tons of progress, so the expectation was that they were going to be able to sustain.&rdquo

Dallas officials said they already are taking those lessons &mdash such as establishing clear exit criteria for campuses and maintaining consistent school leadership &mdash and applying them to other ACE schools. District leaders announced in January that they plan to roll the six original ACE campuses back into the program in 2020-21, relying on a projected $28 million in additional funding from last year&rsquos landmark school finance reform package.

To better support programs like ACE, state lawmakers implemented a funding mechanism designed to reward districts that employ highly-rated educators &mdash as measured by evaluation rubrics relying in part on student performance data &mdash in their highest-poverty campuses. The model awards up to $32,000 for the highest-rated teachers working in the most impoverished campuses.

Houston ISD launched a school turnaround model known as Achieve 180 in 2017-18, but the district offered smaller teacher pay incentives than Dallas and did not mandate extensive staff overhauls. Houston allocated more money than Dallas for its initiative &mdash about $15 million to $20 million per year &mdash but spread the funds over roughly 40 to 50 schools annually.

Students in HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 schools have shown above-average gains on state standardized tests compared to their peers throughout the district and state. However, test scores and discipline rates have improved significantly more at Dallas&rsquo ACE schools than HISD&rsquos Achieve 180 campuses.


Watch the video: otona MUSE2月号の付録はDEAN u0026 DELUCA デリバッグ (May 2022).