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People Are Celebrating Their Birthdays With Meat Cakes and It's Wild

People Are Celebrating Their Birthdays With Meat Cakes and It's Wild


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Don’t count on any frosting

Dreamstime

Meat cakes are the latest food trend from Japan that allows people to celebrate their birthday by grilling strips of meat from a big cake.

Meat cakes, or cake-shaped layered meats, are a huge food trend in Japan right now. According to Japanese lifestyle website Kotaku, they are mainly enjoyed in yakiniku restaurants where diners can grill their own meats. The cakes, typically given to someone during a celebration such as a birthday or a special occasion, are shaped to look like gift boxes and topped with things like sparklers, flowers, and bows.

The idea behind the celebratory creation is that diners can peel off pieces of raw meat from the cake and grill them at their leisure. The craze is really gaining traction on Instagram, where people are posting photos of the pink and red layered creations.

We reported on this back in March, but the phenomenon shows no sign of abating — and the more recent pictures posted to social media have grown even more outrageous.

Don’t think this trend is strictly in Japan — American actress Amy Sedaris is making meat cakes popular in America. The promotion for her new series, At Home with Amy Sedaris, features a four-tiered deli meat cake with impressive rosettes and meat-molded mushrooms. Keep a lookout for meat cakes either in yakiniku restaurants or at any Korean barbecue spots. If you do order one and have to cook your own meat, keep these 10 grilling tips for beginners in mind.


Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."

Never wish a German a happy birthday before their birthday. It is considered bad luck to do so. There are no well-wishes, cards or presents given before a German’s birthday. Period.

On the other hand, if you live in certain parts of Austria, it is customary to celebrate your birthday on the eve of.

If somebody in Germany invites you out for their birthday, the tab is on them. And don’t try insisting on paying for yourself — it won’t work.

If you live in northern Germany and happen to be single going on thirty, a few chores may be expected from you. If you’re female, your friends will want you to clean a few doorknobs for them with a toothbrush! If you’re male, then you’ll most likely be sweeping the stairs of town hall or some other busy public place.
There is a way to be freed from such menial tasks, however — by a kiss from someone of the opposite sex. Of course, if you don't want to be so mean to your friend, there are alternatives. For instance, the doorknob chore is sometimes executed by having the birthday girl clean a series of doorknobs attached to a wooden board instead, right at her party and not in public. But you can't let them off so easy it is also tradition to comically dress the birthday girl and boy as they perform their tasks.

Other birthday customs include:

  • 16th Birthday: This birthday child should run for cover as his or her friends will undoubtedly pour flour on top of his or her head. Common in northern Germany.
  • 18th Birthday: Cracking eggs over the head of someone turning 18.
  • 25th Birthday: Once again, if you are an unmarried man, the whole town will know! A Sockenkranz, a type of garland of socks is strung outside the home and around the birthday boy’s property leading to his party. As he follows the garland of socks, he’ll down an alcoholic drink every few meters. Why socks? In German, you have the expression alte Socke (an old sock), more of a derogatory way of saying "confirmed bachelor.” A similar experience awaits unmarried women turning this age. They follow a garland of cigarette cartons instead (or other similar-sized cartons if they are non-smokers). These single women are nicknamed eine alte Schachtel (an old box), similar in meaning to "old maid."


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Comments:

  1. Jameel

    very useful piece

  2. Ridere

    Sorry that I cannot take part in the discussion right now - there is no free time. I will be released - I will definitely express my opinion on this issue.

  3. Mobei

    It is remarkable, it is rather valuable phrase

  4. Fritz

    Yes, really. And I have faced it. Let's discuss this question.

  5. Rui

    I personally did not like it !!!!!



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