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White Castle Opens 'Laughing Noodle' Restaurant in Sharonville, Ohio

White Castle Opens 'Laughing Noodle' Restaurant in Sharonville, Ohio


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After successful testing in Springfield, Ohio, White Castle will open the first of the co-branded restaurant

White Castle is expanding on the sliders and fries and taking on a new menu: noodles. The Sharonville, Ohio, location will include a new co-branded restaurant under the same roof, Happy Noodle.

White Castle first tested the restaurant in Springfield, Ohio, Cincinnati.com reports; the greater Cincinnati area is the first market for Happy Noodles. The new restaurant will offer a menu of all noodles, from American mac n' cheese to Asian noodle dishes.

A spokesman for White Castle said the new restaurant is a direct response to customers asking for more variety on the menu. Sliders and noodles? White Castle's got it all under one roof.


A Reader Reviews White Castle's New Noodle Venture

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A Reader Reviews White Castle's New Noodle Venture

Yesterday, we brought you one reader’s review of White Castle’s new BBQ experiment in Indiana. As promised, today brings a different reader’s thoughts on the White Castle in Ohio that just started serving up noodles alongside the sliders.

This past weekend, reader Frank paid two separate visits to the White Castle in Springfield, OH, which he says “looks amazingly better… 100% better than before the remodel.” Here, he shares his account of the two trips:

Visit #1: Friday, 9/3/2010:
The first thing I noticed was a nice guy handing out menus and sort of directing traffic — it was busy. One thing to be improved is the traffic flow — somehow there needs to be a better way to “push” customers up the middle of the store (to get in line) rather than having them trying to enter in through left (hope that makes sense!).

When I got up to the cashier — he seemed a little rushed and not really a good salesman to explain the new products — there should be the containers plastered up under the menu board with a tag saying “Actual Size!” so that people could see what they were getting right away, I asked and he seemed annoyed, probably since it was the 100th time that night he’d been asked!

I ordered a full-size chicken parm, and my friend ordered a 1/2-size teriyaki. Both meals were very good, but we both would have enjoyed a piece of bread with it. (Here’s an idea: Take a slider bun, toast and butter it and include with each meal.)

I was impressed with the quality, and quantity of the dish, and the chicken was very good, although I’m not sure about how I feel about it being a nugget-y chicken parm. I think a strip, or something of a bigger size with mozzarella type sprinkle cheese on top would be a little better… but who knows.

The chicken teriyaki was excellent, and had no complaints or comments. We also ordered the cucumber salad ate half of it, and then realized that the cucumber would taste amazing on a slider!! So we ordered a slider, and put it on it, and it was amazing.

Also ordered 1/2-size mac and cheese — this was the best. Also the mint tea was amazing as well — i realized then that both of these would be something I would drive out of my way for.

All in all, the first trip was a great first impression. But, hey — I saw that episode of Undercover Boss and didn’t someone tell the boss that too many people in the kitchen at a new or grand opening store didn’t really help??

There were WAY too many people in the kitchen that night, and they were elbow-to-elbow back there and looking like they were tripping over each other — just thought I’d throw that back at ya.

Visit #2, Sunday 9/5/2010:
Took the kids and they ordered two spaghetti with meatballs. They ate every drop, and said they liked it. Not bad for two 9-year-olds! We ordered two full mac & cheese, and two fries. Both were very good and the quality was just as before the fries were a little soggy, but not the worst I’d seen. Overall a good visit. Although not as busy as Friday evening, the service was good, but the order seemed to take longer to get to the table.

Thanks to Frank, his friend and his kids for sharing their experience!
We’re still looking for someone in the Lebanon, TN, area to volunteer (get it — Tennessee… volunteer? Get it??) to try out the pressed sandwiches at the White Castle/Decker’s combo there.

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Contents

Background Edit

Walter (Walt) A. Anderson (1880–1963), a cook, had been running food stands in Wichita since 1916 when he opened his first diner in a converted streetcar. After a second and third location, he was looking to open a fourth location when he met Edgar Waldo "Billy" A. Ingram, an insurance and real-estate man, and together they started the White Castle chain.

Founding and early activity Edit

White Castle was founded in 1921 in Wichita, Kansas. [10] Anderson partnered with Ingram to make White Castle into a chain of restaurants and market the brand and its distinctive product.

Anderson and Ingram started with only $700 for the original White Castle in Wichita, Kansas. The original location was the northwest corner of First and Main the building is no longer standing. [10]

At the time, Americans were hesitant to eat ground beef after Upton Sinclair's 1906 novel The Jungle had publicized the poor sanitation practices of the meat packing industry. The founders set out to change the public's perception of the cleanliness of the industry they were creating. To invoke a feeling of cleanliness, their restaurants were small buildings with stainless steel interiors, and employees outfitted with spotless uniforms. Their first restaurants in Wichita, Kansas, were a success, and the company branched out into other Midwestern markets, starting in 1922 with El Dorado, Kansas.

1925: White Castle Official House Organ, success, expansion and imitators Edit

The company also began publishing its own internal employee magazine, the White Castle Official House Organ, circa November 1925 (it was originally named The Hot Hamburger). The bulk of the material was contributed by company personnel and consisted mostly of letters and photographs of workers, promotional announcements, 25-year milestones, retirements, and similar items of interest arranged by geographic area. "Employees could. read about the progress and innovations made by those in other areas which made everyone aware of the entire system's direction and condition." [11] The White Castle Official House Organ was published quarterly at least through the early 1980s, and at some point was renamed The Slider Times. The Ohio Historical Society houses an extensive archive of White Castle System, Inc. records from 1921–1991, including issues dating from 1927 to 1970 of the White Castle Official House Organ. [12]

The earliest buildings, such as Indianapolis White Castle #3, built in 1927, had exteriors of white enamel-glazed brick and interiors of enameled steel. The Indianapolis unit was in operation until 1979, making it, at the time of its closure, the longest-operating fast food restaurant in the country. The company constructed this style of building from 1924 to 1929. [13] White Castle Building No. 8, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, originally built in 1936 and remodeled (photo in infobox above), is an example of the chain's buildings with prefabricated white porcelain enamel on steel exteriors. The building measured 28 feet (8.5 m) by 28 feet (8.5 m) and was made to resemble the Chicago Water Tower, with octagonal buttresses, crenelated towers, and a parapet wall. [14] [15]

The success of White Castle led to numerous imitators. Restaurants copied the distinctive architecture of White Castle buildings, as well as created confusion for consumers by using a similar name. The first of these imitators in Wichita was Little Kastle. Many competitors created their names with a play on the White Castle name. Some restaurant chains just replaced the word "Castle" with their own word (Cabin, Cap, Clock, Crescent, Diamond, Dome, Fortress, Grille, House, Hut, Kitchen, Knight, Log, Manna, Mill, Palace, Plaza, Shop, Spot, Tavern, Tower, Turret, Wonder), while others chose to replace "White" with another color or adjective (Blue, King's, Little, Magic, Modern, Prince's, Red, Royal, Silver). Some of the other imitators included Castle Blanca, Blue Beacon, Blue Bell, Blue Tower, Red Barn, Red Lantern, and Klover Kastle. Despite all the competition, none of the competitors was able to match the success of White Castle. [16]

1932: Paperlynen subsidiary Edit

Since fast food was unknown in the United States at the time of White Castle's founding, there was no infrastructure to support the business, as is common with today's fast-food restaurants. The company established centralized bakeries, meat supply plants, and warehouses to supply itself. It was said that the only things that they did not do themselves were raise the cows and grow their own wheat. Ingram developed a device to produce previously unheard of paper hats (for employees to wear as part of the uniform).

In 1932, Ingram set up a subsidiary, Paperlynen, to produce these hats and other paper products used in his restaurants as well as for many other purposes. At the time, White Castle's distribution stretched from Wichita to New York. Ingram decided the central office should be in the center of the distribution area. (To accommodate this, in 1936, the central office would relocate to Columbus, Ohio. Furthermore, in the same year, Ingram decided to close all of the restaurants in the two smallest-profit markets, Wichita and Omaha.)

In 1955, Paperlynen produced over 42 million paper hats worldwide with more than 25,000 different inscriptions. [17]

1934: Porcelain Steel Buildings subsidiary Edit

White Castle also created a subsidiary in 1934 named Porcelain Steel Buildings that manufactured movable, prefabricated, steel frame structures with porcelain enamel interior and exterior panels that could be assembled at any of its restaurant sites. [14] This is the first known use of this material in a building design.

Buyout of Anderson, headquarters relocation, and expansion Edit

In 1933, Anderson sold his half of the business to Ingram, and the following year the company moved its corporate headquarters to Columbus, Ohio. Co-founder Billy Ingram was followed as head of the firm by his son E. W. Ingram Jr. and grandson E. W. Ingram III.

In 1959, White Castle expanded into new markets for the first time since the 1920s. [18] Billy Ingram, who had retired to Miami in 1958, built three White Castle restaurants there. The company closed the Florida operations in 1967 due to inefficient supply distribution. [19]

Throughout its existence, White Castle has been a private company and relied on company-owned stores. It remains privately held today, and its restaurants are all company-owned none is franchised, [ clarification needed ] except very briefly in Japan during the 1980s [20] and more recently in China since 2017. [21]

Cravers' Hall of Fame Edit

In concurrence with its 80th anniversary in 2001, White Castle started its Cravers' Hall of Fame. "Cravers" are inducted annually based on stories written about them by another person or that the particular Craver submits for consideration. Between five and 10 stories have been chosen each year, with a grand total of 64 stories selected through the 2007 induction class. This represents less than 1% of the total stories submitted since the inception of the Cravers' Hall of Fame, an indication of the exclusivity of the honor.

Inductees are invited to attend the White Castle Leadership Conference in the chain's hometown of Columbus, Ohio, with full travel, dining and hotel accommodation expenses covered. Furthermore, each inductee receives a celebratory plaque in front of hundreds of White Castle leadership and operations team members.

Location expansion and vegetable sliders Edit

The first White Castle in the far western United States opened at the Casino Royale Hotel & Casino on the Las Vegas Strip on January 27, 2015. [22] This was the first expansion for White Castle into a region outside the Midwest and Northeast in 56 years. On the first day of business, demand for food was so great that the restaurant had to temporarily close for two hours to restock. [23] White Castle Vice President Jamie Richardson said that the store sold 4,000 sliders per hour in its first 12 hours. He was not aware of any similar closing due to unexepected demand in White Castle's 94-year history. A second White Castle location opened in Las Vegas on September 22, 2017, on Fremont Street, and a third opened in Jean not long after.

In September 2015, White Castle began to offer Veggie Sliders with dairy-free buns to provide a vegan option. [24]

In December 2015, White Castle announced that chief executive officer (CEO) E.W. “Bill” Ingram III would step down at the end of the year, but continue to be chairman of the board. His daughter, Lisa Ingram, then became the fourth CEO of the company. [25] [3]

In 2018, White Castle began offering meat-free Impossible Burgers designed to closely mimic the flavor and texture of beef burgers. [26]

The first White Castle location in Arizona opened in Scottsdale on October 23, 2019. [27]

White Castle announced on November 25, 2019, that the chain would return to Florida after previously leaving the state in 1968, with plans to open the first restaurant in Orlando. [28] A ghost kitchen, operated out of the restaurant while it was under construction, overloaded Uber Eats when it opened for one day on February 24, 2021. [29] The Orlando location opened on May 3, 2021. [30] It is the world's largest White Castle, located on Daryl Carter Parkway off Interstate 4. The opening coincided with White Castle's 100th anniversary.

United States Edit

The Ingram family's steadfast refusal to franchise or take on debt throughout the company's existence has kept the chain relatively small, with a more discontinuous geography than its principal competitors. There are 377 White Castle outlets, predominantly in the Midwest, Kentucky, and Tennessee. The exceptions are about 50 in the New York - New Jersey metropolitan area, three locations around Las Vegas, Nevada, one in Scottsdale, Arizona, one in Orlando, Florida, and two in Shanghai, China. By comparison, there are over 36,000 McDonald's locations globally, with approximately 14,000 of those in the United States. [31] The chain does, however, sell frozen sliders at supermarkets nationwide, with availability varying by chain.

Current White Castle markets in the United States:

Louisville and Columbus also house bulk-manufacturing (grocery-store sales, meat, and bun production) divisions. Company headquarters and the Porcelain Steel Buildings division are in Columbus, Ohio.

In the early 2000s, White Castle tried expanding into three new cities, Philadelphia, Kansas City, and Cleveland-Akron. Those restaurants closed within several years. White Castle exited Cleveland-Akron effective December 25, 2014. [32]

International activities Edit

Through franchise deals with local corporate business partners, White Castle briefly had restaurants outside of the United States in Singapore, Malaysia, and Japan during the late 1980s and early 1990s, but the concept never caught on in those countries. [33] During the same time period, White Castle also tried to establish franchised operations in Mexico and South Korea, but these restaurants also failed. [34] The lone Korean restaurant in Seoul was quietly closed by 1993. [35]

In 1986, White Castle opened its first Japanese restaurant in the city of Osaka via a franchise deal with a Japanese company. [36] [20] There are no reliable records that show when this location closed and when the company finally left the Japanese marketplace. By the end of 1986, the Japanese franchise had six restaurants with a seventh opened by the following year. [37]

In June 1989, White Castle and its local franchise partner Innovest Bhd. opened seven restaurants in Malaysia. Innovest franchise territory included Malaysia and Singapore, and the company had plans to open three more restaurants by the end of the year, with the possibility of having a total of 20 restaurants within its two country region by the following year. [37] [38] There is no evidence if the company did or did not achieve their goals, and there are no reliable sources that describe the fate of these restaurants and when all of these restaurants had finally closed.

The first White Castle franchised location in Mexico opened in Mexico City in 1996, but it also closed after a brief trial run. [39] [40]

In 2017, White Castle opened its first and second restaurants in China in the city of Shanghai through a partnership with Shanghai-based ClearVue Partners. In addition to beef sliders, the Shanghai location also sells a spicy tofu slider and a cherry duck slider, which is smoked duck topped with a sweet cherry sauce. At the time of their openings, these two restaurants were the only White Castle restaurants located outside of the United States. [21]

Although White Castle has never opened any restaurants in Canada, Canadians have been able to purchase White Castle hamburgers from the frozen foods section in select Canadian grocery and convenience stores since 2015 and more recently at Walmart. [41]

White Castle also markets its sandwiches in 30-hamburger boxes, called a Crave Case. [43] The figure of 30 burgers represents the number that can be produced on one of its standard grills at the same time. [44] A "Crave Crate" is also offered, with the contents being 100 burgers. [43] [45]

A variety of White Castle products (mostly frozen) are also sold in grocery stores. [46]

Some locations had been cobranded with Church's Chicken. [47] Church's is a national fried chicken chain of restaurants. That co-branding arrangement ended around 2010.

Around 2012, White Castle experimented with the Laughing Noodle brand that was to share space with White Castle restaurants. The Laughing Noodle concept was discarded a few years later. The Laughing Noodle brand was developed to offer supplemental variety to a White Castle Restaurant. At least one such location was constructed and operated in Sharonville, Ohio. [48]

Although White Castle originated in Wichita, Kansas, the city has not had a restaurant since 1938, nor is there a White Castle restaurant in the entire state of Kansas. White Castle is one of the few restaurant chains that does not have a location in its original city. [8] In the early 2000s, White Castle tried expanding into the Kansas City market, with at least one location in Kansas, but those restaurants were closed several years later.

In April 2020, White Castle respond to the COVID-19 pandemic by announcing that the chain would be delivering free meals to healthcare workers. [49] White Castle also offered a free dessert in the month of May 2021 to anyone who showed a vaccination certificate.

Anderson is credited with the invention of the hamburger bun [50] as well as "the kitchen as assembly line, and the cook as infinitely replaceable technician," [51] hence giving rise to the modern fast-food phenomenon. Due to White Castle's innovation of having chain-wide standardized methods, customers could be sure that they would receive the same product and service in every White Castle restaurant. [52]

Ingram's business savvy not only was responsible for White Castle's success but for the popularization of the hamburger. [53] On January 14, 2014, Time labeled the White Castle slider as the most influential burger of all time. [9]

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle is a 2004 stoner comedy film following the characters of Harold and Kumar as they decide to go to the fast food chain White Castle after smoking marijuana but end up on a series of comical misadventures along the way.

Starting in 2011, a White Castle on Long Island has become a frequent setting for challenges on the show Impractical Jokers, during which the contestants pose as cashiers, drive-thru workers, and janitors. [ citation needed ]

Season 2, episode 9 of The Food that Built America includes features about White Castle. [54] In The King of Queens sitcom Doug Heffernan (Kevin James) often remarks about his desire to go to White Castle.


White Castle expanding noodle concept

After testing its Laughing Noodle concept in Springfield, Ohio, for the past two years, White Castle is now ready to expand the brand to the Cincinnati market.

According to Cincinnati.com, a dual-branded Laughing Noodle/White Castle will open in the Sharonville suburb.

Laughing Noodle's menu features Italian pasta dishes, macaroni and cheese, Asian noodle bowls and more.

According to the story, White Castle customers in Sharonville have been asking for more menu options, which is part of the reason the company is expanding the concept.

White Castle is also testing a barbecue concept – Blaze Modern BBQ – and a sandwich concept – Deckers. The second Deckers location is expected to open this fall in Louisville, Ky.

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I just left lee's on south limestone in Springfield,a place I go to at least 3 times a week,I get home open my food and someone Literally took a b. read more

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How They Did It: White Castle’s 90 Years of Success

In 1921, Billy Ingram, from Wichita, Kan., was selling insurance and real estate to businesses around town. One of his clients was a thriving hamburger stand and, impressed by its success, Ingram proposed a partnership. Soon, his family took over the burger stand and turned it into a restaurant named White Castle .

Today, nearly 90 years later, White Castle is a household name. All of its more than 420 locations are still run by the Ingram family, none are franchised. Dave Rife (pictured above), Ingram’s great grandson, is the company’s assistant vice president and, as of late, a modern day celebrity.

“I was featured on the CBS show Undercover Boss in February,” he said. “It was a lot of fun and a great way to highlight our team members.”

Ingram died when Rife was three years old, but the burger tycoon’s memory is still very much alive.

“We run the business today just like my great grandfather did back then,” Rife said. “We have a great track record and have never laid anyone off.”

How has White Castle stayed successful throughout the years?

“Our business model is all about slow and steady growth,” Rife said. “We don’t have any debt and always pay out of cash flow. As my great grandfather used to say, ‘it’s hard to go out of business if you don’t owe anyone.’”

Focusing on employees

“We’ve never underestimated the power of our people,” he said. “We listen to what they tell us. They are the ones on the front line of our organization and come up with great ideas.

“We look out for our employees and supply all of our full-time team members with health care, pension funds and profit sharing opportunities. As my great grandfather used to say, ‘happy employees mean happy customers.’”

Staying true to the business

“We have always stuck to our core competencies,” Rife said. “We sell hamburgers. We haven’t changed our recipes or our format. We make our own patties and bake our own buns. Our customers know what to expect."

“We make it a point to celebrate our successes,” he said. “Whenever a team member reaches 25 years of service, we fly them to Columbus, Ohio (headquarters since the 1930s) for a week-long celebration of wining and dining.

“Just last December, we had our team member, Elaine Miseta, retire after 67 years of service. Her anniversary date is June 8, so now that day is known at Elaine Miseta Day at White Castle.”

What does the future hold for the burger chain?

“We are busy opening new restaurant concepts,” Rife said. “This year, we opened Deckers in Tennessee, which sells grilled sandwiches, Blaze Modern BBQ in Lafayette, Indiana and Laughing Noodle in Springfield, Ohio.”

According to Rife, White Castle will remain family owned for years to come.

“We are fortunate to be family owned,” he said. “That way, we are able to make decisions based on long term growth opportunities, not short term earnings.”

Katie Morell is a freelance writer based in Chicago, specializing in small business concerns.

In 1921, Billy Ingram, from Wichita, Kan., was selling insurance and real estate to businesses around town. One of his clients was a thriving hamburger stand and, impressed by its success, Ingram proposed a partnership. Soon, his family took over the burger stand and turned it into a restaurant named White Castle .

Today, nearly 90 years later, White Castle is a household name. All of its more than 420 locations are still run by the Ingram family, none are franchised. Dave Rife (pictured above), Ingram’s great grandson, is the company’s assistant vice president and, as of late, a modern day celebrity.

“I was featured on the CBS show Undercover Boss in February,” he said. “It was a lot of fun and a great way to highlight our team members.”

Ingram died when Rife was three years old, but the burger tycoon’s memory is still very much alive.

“We run the business today just like my great grandfather did back then,” Rife said. “We have a great track record and have never laid anyone off.”

How has White Castle stayed successful throughout the years?

“Our business model is all about slow and steady growth,” Rife said. “We don’t have any debt and always pay out of cash flow. As my great grandfather used to say, ‘it’s hard to go out of business if you don’t owe anyone.’”

Focusing on employees

“We’ve never underestimated the power of our people,” he said. “We listen to what they tell us. They are the ones on the front line of our organization and come up with great ideas.

“We look out for our employees and supply all of our full-time team members with health care, pension funds and profit sharing opportunities. As my great grandfather used to say, ‘happy employees mean happy customers.’”

Staying true to the business

“We have always stuck to our core competencies,” Rife said. “We sell hamburgers. We haven’t changed our recipes or our format. We make our own patties and bake our own buns. Our customers know what to expect."

“We make it a point to celebrate our successes,” he said. “Whenever a team member reaches 25 years of service, we fly them to Columbus, Ohio (headquarters since the 1930s) for a week-long celebration of wining and dining.

“Just last December, we had our team member, Elaine Miseta, retire after 67 years of service. Her anniversary date is June 8, so now that day is known at Elaine Miseta Day at White Castle.”

What does the future hold for the burger chain?

“We are busy opening new restaurant concepts,” Rife said. “This year, we opened Deckers in Tennessee, which sells grilled sandwiches, Blaze Modern BBQ in Lafayette, Indiana and Laughing Noodle in Springfield, Ohio.”

According to Rife, White Castle will remain family owned for years to come.

“We are fortunate to be family owned,” he said. “That way, we are able to make decisions based on long term growth opportunities, not short term earnings.”

Katie Morell is a freelance writer based in Chicago, specializing in small business concerns.


White Castle Could Be Your Ticket to an Olympic Luging Career

The fast food chain has extended its partnership with USA Luge.

One of the hottest trends in food marketing, apparently, is using the double meaning of a common word to spur a promotional tie-in with an often-overlooked winter sport! Two years ago, Cheetos — the self-proclaimed master of the cheese curl — used a pun as their reasoning for sponsoring USA Curling as the team pursued their dream of medaling at the 2018 Winter Olympics. (The men’s team took gold so don’t knock the hustle!) Now, today, White Castle announced that they too were sticking with their pun-based winter sport sponsorship: The burger chain has extended its official partnership with USA Luge, assuring that “the nation’s two foremost slider experts” will be working together in the lead up to the 2019 Luge World Championships in Winterberg, Germany.

Yes, that town name sounds super fake (it’s actually very real!) but don’t worry: The strange names are just beginning. White Castle’s continued partnership also means an extension of USA Luge’s largest recruitment program: the White Castle USA Luge Slider Search. White Castle explains that over 1,200 youth have participated in these free clinics the last two years, and the program has been “responsible for discovering 65 percent of all current junior athletes in the USA Luge system and three of six athletes competing in the 2019 Luge World Championships.” It just goes to prove my theory that if you offer kids White Castle, they will luge!

𠇊t White Castle, we’ve been honing our slider skills for 98 years, and we’re always interested in opportunities to further our expertise,” Lynn Blashford, vice president of marketing at White Castle, said in the announcement. 𠇊s a family-owned business, we understand exactly what it takes to add to the team, and we’re excited to continue our partnership with USA Luge to share the sport of luge and discover the next generation of USA Luge sliders.”

If you have a child aged nine through 13 who might be interested in being pulled into the world of competitive luging thanks to the lure of a fast food sponsorship, this year’s White Castle USA Luge Slider Search will kick off in Columbus, Ohio, in early May with additional stops coast-to-coast to be announced at a later date.

“We’re thrilled to continue our partnership with White Castle to bring the Slider Search to cities around the country this off-season to share the sport of luge and find new, young athletes to add to the successes of USA Luge,” Gordy Sheer, USA Luge director of marketing and sponsorships and a 1998 Olympic silver medalist, stated. “Over the first two years of our partnership with White Castle, we saw an incredible ninety percent increase in youth that were introduced to the sport through the Slider Search.” Who knew White Castle could be the first stop on your path to an Olympic medal?!


White Castle Opens 'Laughing Noodle' Restaurant in Sharonville, Ohio - Recipes

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White Castle Gets Its Own Beer Courtesy of Weyerbacher Brewing

The Pennsylvania brewery was serving some suspiciously-named beers at its taproom this summer.

Pennsylvania’s Weyerbacher Brewing Company is one of the beer world’s sadder stories. Launched in 1995, Weyerbacher was making some of the best beers in the country during craft brewing’s first major surge𠅋ut earlier this year, as sales growth in the beer industry slowed while the number of breweries continued to rapidly increase, Weyerbacher filed for bankruptcy, struggling to find its niche in the current market. However, the brand has kept on kicking𠅊nd they’ve apparently come up with a pretty novel plan to help turn a profit again… making beers with White Castle.

Weyerbacher’s Chief Operating Officer Josh Lampe recently told the beer industry site Brewbound that his brand has already tested out a brew with the fast food slider chain and that they’re looking to bring it to as many as 400 White Castle locations across 13 states. Though the beer doesn’t have a name yet, they’ll apparently be kicking things off with a typically easy-drinking ale-lager hybrid style known as a kolsch. “We did a pilot brew for them, a kolsch that they loved, so that’s gonna be the first beer,” Lampe was quoted as saying. “It goes well with burgers.”

According to the beer rating app Untappd, Weyerbacher was piloting two suspiciously-named kolschs earlier this year: “Slider Beer” in May and 𠇌rave Nation” in August. Though the beers only have eight ratings on the app in total, the feedback was positive. “Solid beer. A nice light change for Weyerbacher. Slightly hoppy. Light,” wrote one user. Another exclaimed, “Super crushable kolsch!”

Meanwhile, though White Castle Vice President Jamie Richardson wasn’t able to delve into to many details, he did tell me via email that a beer was in the works. 𠇊s we prepare to celebrate our 100th birthday in 2021, we are in the midst of planning lots of fun initiatives and surprises,” he wrote. “It’s too early for us to comment on any specifics about how widely available a White Castle inspired beer might be in our restaurants, but we’re enjoying the creative process we’re working on right now in real time.”

Beyond serving the beer at White Castle restaurants, Weyerbacher is also reportedly hoping to sell the beer in grocery stores that stock frozen White Castle products and eventually collaborate on several beers with the burger chain. The brewery is even predicting that its forthcoming White Castle collaboration could make up about 20 percent of its 30,000 barrel capacity next year. If you like beer and White Castle, sounds like 2020 could end up being the year of your dreams.

Currently, both White Castle and Weyerbacher coexist in seven states: New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. Lampe told Brewbound that the brewery would have to expand its distribution area to reach the rest of White Castle’s locations in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, and, coming next month, Arizona.

Food & Wine reached out to Weyerbacher for confirmation on this collaboration, but have yet to receive a response.


Tri-State couple gets married at White Castle

SHARONVILLE, OH (FOX19) - Not a traditional place to hold a wedding, but Nicole Xique and Brian Breezley made it official at White Castle.

They were the winners of 96ROCK's White Castle wedding radio contest. The ceremony was conducted at the Hauck Road White Castle in Sharonville.

"We are the most unconventional couple, and a conventional wedding would not suffice. I have younger children, he has older children, and our relationship began as a friendship," said Nicole Xique. "Having our wedding at White Castle on Friday the 13 th is the perfect way to show the conventional folks that unconventional folks have more fun!"

Nicole and Brian have been in a relationship for about one year and won based on their contest entry.

Contestants were asked to submit a photo and essay stating why the entrant and his/her fiancé wanted to be married at White Castle.

Each application was judged on the creativity, sincerity and originality of the story.

"At White Castle, we are dedicated to providing a place for our customers to create memorable moments," said Jamie Richardson, vice president of White Castle. "Nothing warms our hearts more than being able to witness two people come together in one of our restaurants. It's exciting for us to be a part of their lives.".

96ROCK provided a cake, wedding bands, flowers by Say I Do Weddings & Events, photography by Ziegelmeyer Photography, tuxedo rental through Geno's Tux + Plus and limo accommodations through Jimmy's Limousine Service.

White Castle is no stranger to weddings and engagements. More than 75 couples have been married at "Love Castles" across the nation over the past 10 years.


Watch the video: Castle Skateland Ep1. (June 2022).


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