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Eating Deep-Fried Maple Leaves Is Big In Japan

Eating Deep-Fried Maple Leaves Is Big In Japan


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Fried tempura leaves are considered a delicious delicacy in certain regions of Japan

These actually look pretty delicious. Would you try one?

Noshing on pumpkin-flavored everything for fall is for newbies. In Japan, people eat autumn leaves straight off the tree. Well, first they’re deep-fried in tempura. Tempura-fried maple leaves are an extremely popular autumnal-themed snack in certain regions of Japan. They’re called “Momiji,” and can actually be prepared and eaten all year round.

Tempura-battered momiji have been around for more than a millennium, and so the story goes, that when one tourist traveled to Osaka’s Minootaki waterfall in the fall 1,300 years ago, he was so taken by the beauty of the surrounding maple trees, that he decided to fry some leaves in rapeseed oil and consume them. In the 19th century, the tempura-fried leaves were commercialized.

You can get them in many regions of Japan, order them online, or even pick some leaves off your neighbor’s maple tree and make a batch yourself. One recipe encourages brushing the leaves with maple syrup, dipping the leaves into a basic tempura batter, and then frying the creations in a vat of sunflower oil.

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Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on [email protected]


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.


Traditional Dining in Japan

TOKYO — As we have noted in our discussions of restaurants in Japan, most of them are specialty places that offer numerous variations on one specific food or method of cooking.

Thus, there are sushi and sashimi restaurants those that serve nothing but dishes made of turtle, for example, or globe fish, or noodles. There are places primarily for drinking sake that serve foods designed to go especially well with that notably convivial drink, and there are yakitori restaurants that deal solely (or, almost) in grilled chicken pieces on skewers. There are still others where tempura is the main thing.

There are also, however, numerous, perhaps more traditional places, where foods are served in sequence in somewhat formal settings, with guests seated on the floor and served by a hostess in traditional kimono.

We spent a pleasant two hours recently at one such place, the highly acclaimed Ginsaryo Restaurant, Ginza, San‐chome, Sanbanchi 3. It is a small, more or less formal restaurant (men may properly remove their jackets) with only seven rooms, and the meal began with the usual steaming face cloth to cleanse the hands and face and a cup of green tea, the national beverage of welcome and cordiality.

The first course consisted of hors d'oeuvres, not so much arranged as designed on various plates. There was fresh salmon and salmon roe a sweet chestnut small fish pickled in a sweet soy syrup and deep‐fried shrimp.

Sashimi was served, small slices of fresh‐caught Japanese sole and tuna, followed by a bowl of steaming turtle Soup containing a small snapper egg. In sequence came an exceptionally good teriyaki dish made with more small fish fillets interlarded with sliced mushrooms, sandwiched between small wooden cedar squares to give flavor and garnished with roasted gingko nuts In the shell.

A chef's fantasy, something dubbed “flying dragon's lead,” appeared. It was a blend of bean curd and fresh lily buds, among other things, deep fried and served in a broth with sliced fish roe and aromatic poached chrysanthemum leaves.

The cost of dinner at Ginsaryo's is about $30 a person and reservations are essential. The telephone number is 561‐0355.

If you are in Japan and have never sampled a traditional Japanese breakfast—cho‐shoku—you've never begun to plumb the depths of Japanese dining.

There are many Westerners, of course, would view such a meal—early morning or otherwise—with jaundiced eye, but then again there are those to whom the thought of eating raw fish—which may or may not figure in a Japanese breakfast—is gastronomic anathema.

One of the most agreeable sources for a cho‐shoku in Tokyo is the Japanese dining room of the Okura Hotel. The components of the meal—of which there are several—are served in china or lacquered dishes on a lacquered tray and the principal entry is perhaps shioyaki, a neatly portioned, briefly salted wedge of fresh salmon broiled without a trace of added fat.

It is a tantalizing centerpoint complemented in no small way by a piping hot bowl of miso or bean or bean curd soup containing small squares of bean curd and midget — size brown wild mushroom caps, by a modest portioned and delectable hot side dish of chicken pieces and small‐cut vegetables (or whole finger‐size eggplant) a wedge of rolled omelet served lukewarm with grated daikon or Japanese radish a bowl of perfectly cooked rice, unseasoned so as to accentuate the other flavors and, invariably, assorted fresh pickles, prepared overnight from numerous vegetables, including eggplant, cauliflower, cucumbers, radish and lotus root.

The meal is served with a never‐ending supply of hot green tea, with the cost of a complete meal about $3.35, service included.

It would seem apparent that the chief hallmarks of a fine tempura are two. One is any apparent oiliness in the various foods when they are served another is the crisp and fragile nature of the tempura coating as it comes from the wok.

One of the best tempuras we've sampled here is that of the Hige‐no‐Tenpei at 6‐1 Chome, Kyobishi, Chuo Ku in Tokyo. It is a series of foods to be marveled at on several counts.

The ingredients are served direct from the wok at a stylish, scrubbed — to — a — polish counter and included shrimp a fine — fleshed small fish called sillago small bundles of shimeji, long — stemmed, small — capped, white — fleshed mushrooms snow white squid small, mild‐flavored green chilies baby eggplants the size of a midget's index finger, and sea‐eel, smooth textured and rich in flavor.

The meal was superior, and cost about $17 a person for the complete tempura with fruit for dessert. The Hige‐no‐Tenpei has “private” dining rooms as well as the tempura bar.

A short while later we were taken to another tempura house, the Inagiku at IchibaDori near Nihonbashi. This is the original of the Japanese restaurant recently opened in the Waldorf‐Astoria in New York. It is in a handsome but modest old mansion with the main dining room on the second floor.

The tempura was, all in all, quite tempting, prepared in tender batter and cooked in fresh oil. The series included 18 different foods, including small prawns, sea‐eel, something translated as kiss fish white bait, scallops, squid, lotus root, wild mushrooms, egg plant, Japanese celery and asparagus.

It must be said that tempura at the Inagiku was, to our taste, only a few cuts above what we are accustomed to at tempura bars in New York. The cost, with sake, is about $22 a person.

There are certain restaurants in Japan, we are told, that Japanese men have patronized for a couple of centuries to sip sake and settle those personal animosities that come about in the course of an ordinary day.

Arguments of a personal or business nature, our informant told us, are settled in these bistros in a most amicable fashion, for sake has a way of soothing bad tempers and hurt feelings. The prototypes of these places were establishments where working‐class people came to solve their frustrations, then the upper class came and restaurants agreed that such places were too good for the average man so they opened their own.

These establishments are known as oden restaurants. As the popularity of the sake houses increased, certain foods became known as oden, contrived expressly to complement the drinking of sake, came into being. Oden dishes are rather substantial in contrast to otzumami, which are small things, tidbits, appetizers and the like to be taken with the fingers and eaten with sake.

Our experience (we didn't feel antagonistic toward anything) with oden came about at a small hole‐in‐the‐wall known as Otomi in the New Ginza Daiichi Building, 11‐10, Ginza 7‐chome, Chuo‐ku.

The meal began with appetizers, including cold braised scallops that had been notably cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar and ginger, followed by a full‐bodied clear soup containing slivers of fish, chicken, gingko nuts cooked in various ways (gingko nuts are very big in Japan at this time of year), and matsutake, the meatyflavored wild mushrooms.

Choices were made from a large variety of boiled or steamed foods, including a Japanese version of steamed cabbage vegetables in consomme steamed chicken balls and deep‐fried bean curd patties (ganmodoki) made with chopped vegetables. One of the most unusual dishes was a small bowl of cold baked but still rare bonito served like sashimi with a soy and garlic sauce.

The cost of a meal, including six or seven pieces of oden, is about $5. Sake costs about $1 a small bottle.