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Girdle scones recipe

Girdle scones recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Bread
  • Scones

These girdle scones are a traditional Scottish favourite. They are also sometimes known as griddle scones.

39 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 10 girdle scones

  • 280g (10 oz) self raising flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 30g to 60g (1 to 2 oz) butter
  • milk, as needed

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:8min ›Ready in:23min

  1. Into a bowl sift together the flour and salt then rub in the butter with your fingers until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Gradually add just enough milk to form a dough.
  2. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead very lightly for a few minutes then using a rolling pin roll out to 5mm (1/4 in) thickness. Using a fluted or plain cutter, cut into rounds.
  3. Place the scones onto a greased and floured moderately hot girdle and cook for 4 minutes each side or until browned and risen. Remove from the heat and serve hot or cold.

Tip

A baking girdle should be well greased then heated until a little water sprinkled on the surface skips about in balls and evaporates.

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Irish or Scottish Soda Scones (White Bannocks) with Buttermilk

Soda scones, whether they be traditional Irish or Scottish, (also referred to as white bannocks) aren’t just for St Patrick’s Day! After you try this recipe, soda scones may become a favorite in your household quite quickly!

I may ruffle some red hair here, but did you know that Saint Patrick was born in Scotland?

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Do your own google search if you don’t believe me, but it’s true. I’ll give you a minute. See, I told you!

And if that’s not news to you, did you also know that he was Italian? Just like me–born in Scotland to Italian parents! How cool is that? Now that you’ve learned something new, let’s get to the cooking part.

I’m going to show you how to make a quick and easy recipe for soda scones to celebrate the day of the patron saint of Ireland. Both the Irish and Scots make these versatile scones, or white bannocks.

Once you try them, I bet you just won’t be making them once a year!


Recipe Summary

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup shortening or lard
  • 1 tablespoon corn syrup
  • 1 ½ cups buttermilk, or as needed

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, sugar, and salt. Cut in the shortening with a fork, pastry blender, or by pinching between your fingers. Make a well in the center, and pour in the corn syrup and buttermilk. Stir with a sturdy spoon to form a soft dough. Divide the dough in half, and pat out into 3/4 inch thick circles on a floured surface. Cut each circle into 6 wedges.

Heat a griddle over medium heat, and grease lightly with cooking spray or oil. Cook scones on each side, then stand them on edge, and cook all three edges. Cool on a wire rack.


Why make tattie scones?

Tattie scones are pretty cheap to buy in supermarkets across Scotland, but they’re not quite the same as the home-made variety. Homemade tattie scones turn out soft and light rather than stiff and a little salty like the bought kind.

Making your own offers a little extra something to a cooked breakfast and really gives you a taste of Scotland.

Traditionally Tattie Scones would have been made after a midday meal when any leftover potatoes were still warm. They’d be cooked on a dry girdle (griddle), liberally smeared with butter and rolled up to eat. Any cold leftovers could be re-heated by toasting or frying with butter.

This recipe really is simple once you learn one or two tricks to help you make it work along the way. It’s something a little bit different from making bread and uses up potatoes when you need to. Not only can the potato scones be eaten in a variety of delicious ways, but they also freeze well too!


Girdle scones recipe - Recipes

Scone is a single serving quick bread or a cake, they are prepared with flour or oatmeal with baking powder, lightly sweetened and glazed occasionally. Usually scone was round and flat but today scones exists also in triangle shaped. When sold commercially scones will be usually round, but when prepared at home, they may take various shapes like rounds, squares and triangles. Baking scones at home is very easy to make and you can make them either as sweet ones or savoury ones just by adding any ingredient of your choice. Personally i love to add chocolate chips, raisins or simply nuts in sweet scones. While savory scones can be prepared with cheese, onions or with varieties of chopped herbs.

Griddle scone or girdle scone is a variety of scone prepared in a griddle which is fried in a small amount of butter or in a frying pan than baking. This way of making scones is very common in New Zealand, where scones of all varieties forms an important part of the traditional cuisine. In New Zealand,this griddle scones are cooked in large disk which is divided into wedges for serving. Griddle scones are served often with jam,butter or simply with honey for breakfast.These griddle scones will have a super golden crust with a tender interior. Am running my first week of blogging marathon and theme of this week is Do E-N from the List of Breakfast Foods, i picked this griddle scones from the list and enjoyed thoroughly for our sunday brunch.Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM#41.

2cups All purpose flour
1tsp Baking soda
3/4tsp Salt
3/4cup Buttermilk
1/4cup Melted butter

Sieve together the flour,baking soda and salt in a bowl.

Add in the buttermilk,melted butter and mix everything, knead slowly to form a soft dough.

Pull out the dough in a lightly floured surface, divide into half, knead each half for three to four times.

Roll or pat each hald into 6inch round disc, cut each as 4 wedges.

Heat a griddle or a pan in low heat until hot, cook the scones over low heat, increase the heat slowly and cook until the scones are puffed.


Girdle Scones (Scones Part 2)


So, back to Scotland and my quest to bake the evolutionary forefathers of what we now know as the scone. For my previous posting I baked an oatmeal bannock - bannocks being the great-grandaddy of the scone. To recap: a bannock was originally a loaf of unleavened bread, circular in shape, and baked on the girdle. The name is now applied to all manner of girdle-baked doughs (sweetened, unsweetened, leavened or unleavened), and can refer to a large plate-sized scone. The original of the oatmeal bannock recipe that I used would have produced an unleavened bread. The 'modern' version of the recipe included bicarbonate of soda, although I found that the lift this gave the dough was very limited. Elizabeth David in 'English Bread and Yeast Cookery', comments that the chemical raising agents available to the home-baker from the second half of the 19th century, were first used to introduce some lightness into 'biscuits, girdle scones, oatcakes, and other bakestone products that had previously been made without an aerating agent'. The bannock I cooked was akin to a large doughy oatcake, with a pretty stodgy consistency and so I wanted to find a recipe that would step closer to producing the type of light scone that goes down so nicely with toppings of cream and jam (particularly in the south-west of England).

I returned to F. Marian McNeill's book 'The Scots Kitchen', and selected a recipe entitled 'White Girdle Scones, or Soda Scones'. The 'white' refers to the fact that these scones are made with wheat flour, rather than oatmeal or barleymeal (these along with rye are Scotland's traditional grains) the secondary title reveals that the scones are leavened in the same way as soda bread is - with baking soda and cream of tartar. They are, naturally, cooked on a metal hot-plate, rather than oven-baked.

450g plain flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp cream of tartar
1/2 tsp salt
Buttermilk to mix to a dough (I used up a 284ml carton, and had to top up with milk)

1. Preheat your girdle (no need to grease).
2. Sieve flour, bicarbonate of soda, cream of tartar and salt into a bowl.
3. Add the buttermilk and gently mix in to form a very soft dough.
4. Divide dough into four. Take each piece and shape into a circle and then press gently with your hand to flatten to approx. 1/2inch depth (I started off with a rolling pin, but found it easier to work without it). Cut each circle into four quarters.


5. Pop each quarter onto the girdle. Leave to cook until the dough has swollen and risen slightly, and the base of the scone is light brown (about five minutes). Flip and cook other side. The insides should be cooked when the edges of the scone are dry (if your girdle is too hot the outsides will scorch and the inside will remind doughy - this MAY have happened to one or two of mine, but I will never admit it).


Although some of my quartered scones looked a little abstract post-girdling (if that isn't a verb, then it damn well should be), I was pleased with the general appearance of them. I was careful to not overwork the dough by handling it too much or too roughly, and the last scones on the girdle looked as well as those that hit the plate first. Hopefully this bodes well for my next round of scone baking.

What to top my girdle scones with for sampling purposes? Well, I happened to have a jar of Norwegian blueberry jam, given to me by a friend whose sister lives there. Blueberries are the cultivated form of the bilberry or blaeberry that grows wild in Scotland and the north of England. McNeil gives a recipe for blaeberry jam. It seemed an appropriate choice therefore for my scone topping (along with a lick of butter). The scones had a moist bread-like consistency, with a neutral flavour that made them an excellent back-drop to butter and jam (or even butter alone). I also found that they made a reasonable bread roll substitute to accompany our lunch-time soup. A scone for all purposes, and wrapped in a tea-towel they stayed moist all day, eating well even when cold.

This recipe pushed closer to producing the type scone served in such quantity in Devon, Cornwall, Dorset and Somerset, although the method and ingredients are sufficiently different to ensure that these girdle scones have quite different character. The similarity between these girdle scones and the West Country scones is that they cook to a light, moist dough/crumb. Those 19th century chemists can, I think, take some thanks for their role in the development of the old style unleavened bannock into such good things as these.

My next scone journey will see me descend from the hob to the oven. I am stock-piling clotted cream in anticipation.


I would like to sign off this post by saying hello to all the bloggers (and a couple of partners) that I met yesterday at Johanna and Jeanne's blog party (a joint second birthday). It was great to meet everyone, and I look forward to checking out those sites that are new to me. For those not in attendance, we ate magnificently (inventive canapes, climaxing with a chocolate fountain), and drunk copious amounts of sparkling wine. I didn't take my camera because I knew that the event would be well documented (a gathering of bloggers - how could it not be so!). The weather and setting were fantastic, and Johanna and Jeanne were the perfect hostesses - helped by Carolyn, Johanna's daughter. Thank you ladies!


Comments

Sean McKeown on May 06, 2020:

Made these last week, took me back to my Grannie&aposs kitchen in Northern Ireland. Thank you so much

Morag Burke on June 10, 2018:

Made these for the first time today They were lovely .I would probably put the griddle lower next time to make the outside a bit softer. practice makes perfect I suppose.

Maura Arter on March 15, 2018:

I&aposm from Belfast living in the states, my mother made this same soda bread all the time, did your grandmother make potato farls too ?, I have made them but they never taste just like my mothers, they are great right of the griddle with butter and also really tasty fried up with bacon and eggs for breakfast..

John k on February 26, 2017:

Tip: when cooked wrap in a clean tea towel and allow to cool naturally. This will help make the out side of your soda farl nice and soft.

Anne Lutton on October 14, 2016:

Potato Apple Bread, Think might be unique to County Armagh Area. Boil Potatoes, Mash smoothly add salt and little Butter, Bind together with a little plain flour by hand. Roll out to circle and add thin sliced bramley apple on 1/2 of circle, wet edges and fold over into semi circle. Cook slowly on a Griddle. When cooked through open up and sprinkle sugar to taste over apples and a few knobs of butter, close up again and enjoy!

Emilie on March 09, 2016:

Sounds like my grandma, right down to the dusting of flour on the griddle, the skewer, and NEVER measuring. She just dipped her hand in the flour bin and got to work. Great memories.

Marie McKeown (author) from Ireland on December 05, 2015:

Glad you have found a way around the lack of buttermilk!

Kieran Savage on November 19, 2015:

I live in Thailand and butter milk is hard to come by. I improvise by using whole milk with enough vinegar to give it the tartness of buttermilk. Luckily cast iron cook ware is still easily obtained ,albeit rough cast . It does the job really well. We are blessed to have a German Butcher who cures his own bacon which tastes like bacon used to taste and gives a clear moisture free fat just make for frying free range eggs.


Singin' Hinnies - Northumbrian Tea-Time Griddle Cakes/Scones

Served warm and oozing with butter, these fabulous fruity griddlecakes make a great treat for breakfast or afternoon tea. I remember my grandmother making these when I was little she lived in a very old stone cottage in Northumberland, and made these on a huge cast iron black griddle, or girdle as they were also called! We used to eat them hot from the griddle, with butter – in front of a roaring wood fire during the winter months. Singin' hinnies are a type of fried fruit scone or griddle cake, so called as they 'sing' and sizzle whilst cooking. 'Hinny' is a Northern term for endearment used especially to children - my grandmother used to call me &quothinny&quot. Similar to singin' hinnies are Northumbrian griddle cakes, also known as Gosforth gridies. If you are making them for a children’s party or at Christmas, put coins that have been briefly boiled, then wrapped in greaseproof paper, in the middle of some of the singin’ hinnies.


Tamarind and Thyme

I returned from that trip to Arundel with a slight obsession with cheese scones. We had them twice there – a sturdy savoury one at Motte & Bailey Cafe and a tender flaky one at Belinda’s. Both were served warm and with plenty of butter. Hot savoury salty strong cheesy scones with cold butter… I fell in love.

Alas, we still don’t have an oven at home but I discovered, after a bit of searching, girdle scones… a Scottish type of scone that’s cooked on a girdle, i.e. a griddle. Perfect! Essentially all I’d need is a flat surface over heat – I had that at least! It’s exactly like a scone – simple ingredients, minimising handling of the dough, quick cooking. And even if you do have an oven, with this recipe, there’s no need to preheat it! The scones I made were perfect and puffed up nicely over the heat. Flaky, savoury…. oh boy, time to make another batch.

Cheese Girdle Scones
Makes 8 (serves 2-4)
Adapted from a recipe from Sunday Hot Pants

1 cup plain flour
2 tsps baking powder
1 tbsp cold butter
A pinch of salt
1/2 cup grated mature cheddar
A scant 1/2 cup milk

Combine the flour, baking powder and salt well. Cut in the cold butter until the butter pieces resemble rolled oats. Stir in the cheese.

Add the milk a little at a time, mixing it in each time – you may not need all of it. If it feels too wet, add some flour. But don’t overwork the mixture use a light hand. Form the soft dough into a round about 1.5 cm thick. Cut this round into 8 wedges.

Heat a frying pan (I used nonstick but I think cast iron would be good too) over medium low heat. Place the round into the pan, keeping the wedges tightly together. Cook them on both sides until they are cooked through and golden brown on their sides. This will be about 5-7 minutes per side. If you’re concerned about the centre not cooking through, you can also put their cut sides directly over the heat.

For a sweet version, skip the cheese and add some sugar and currants. I reckon these can be easily customised.


Girdle Scones

I returned to F. Marian McNeill’s book The Scots Kitchen , and selected a recipe entitled ‘White Girdle Scones, or Soda Scones’. The ‘white’ refers to the fact that these scones are made with wheat flour, rather than oatmeal or barleymeal (these along with rye are Scotland’s traditional grains) the secondary title reveals that the scones are leavened in the same way as soda bread is – with baking soda and cream of tartar. They are, naturally, cooked on a metal hot-plate, rather than oven-baked.


450g plain flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp cream of tartar
1/2 tsp salt
Buttermilk to mix to a dough (I used up a 284ml carton, and had to top up with milk)

1. Preheat your girdle (no need to grease).
2. Sieve flour, bicarbonate of soda, cream of tartar and salt into a bowl.
3. Add the buttermilk and gently mix in to form a very soft dough.
4. Divide dough into four. Take each piece and shape into a circle and then press gently with your hand to flatten to approx. 1/2inch depth (I started off with a rolling pin, but found it easier to work without it). Cut each circle into four quarters.



Although some of my quartered scones looked a little abstract post-girdling (if that isn’t a verb, then it should be), I was pleased with the general appearance of them. I was careful to not overwork the dough by handling it too much or too roughly, and the last scones on the girdle looked as well as those that hit the plate first.

What to top my girdle scones with for sampling purposes? Well, I happened to have a jar of Norwegian blueberry jam, given to me by a friend whose sister lives there. The scones had a moist, bread-like consistency, with a neutral flavour that made them an excellent backdrop to butter and jam (or even butter alone). I also found that they made a reasonable bread roll substitute to accompany our lunchtime soup. A scone for all purposes, and wrapped in a tea-towel they stayed moist all day, eating well even when cold.