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Pinkberry tests Greek yogurt for breakfast

Pinkberry tests Greek yogurt for breakfast

The frozen yogurt chain Pinkberry is testing breakfast.

Instead of its signature frozen yogurt, test locations are offering coffee and unfrozen Greek yogurt, which can be topped with a variety of fruit, granola or natural sweeteners, like fruit purees, infused honey or agave nectar.

Pinkberry joins a growing number of frozen yogurt chains that are adding Greek yogurt to their menus, responding to the growing popularity of the higher-protein product as a meal replacement. TCBY, 16 Handles, and Ben and Jerry’s have introduced new frozen Greek yogurt flavors this summer, but generally as a later-daypart snack. Pinkberry may be the first to target breakfast.

“People are increasingly adopting Greek yogurt into their morning routine,” said Ron Graves, Pinkberry’s chief executive. “As a yogurt retailer, we saw the opportunity to redefine the Greek yogurt experience with our exceptionally fresh and high quality toppings to offer a fresh, healthy breakfast.”

For the test, select units in Los Angeles, Boston and Washington, D.C., will open at 8 a.m.

Signature offerings will include:

Chocolate Berry, featuring Greek yogurt topped with blueberries, raspberries, chocolate granola, honey and shaved milk chocolate

Strawberry, with toppings that include freshly cut strawberries, mangos, sliced almonds, shaved coconut and strawberry puree

Cucumber, a savory option, with toppings such as freshly cut cucumbers, sesame nuggets, diced red and yellow peppers, a drizzle of honey and a touch of chili powder

The Greek yogurt will be available in four-ounce and six-ounce sizes.

A six-ounce serving contains 18 grams of protein, as well as live and active cultures. The yogurt has no fat and is low in sugar.

The coffee Pinkberry will serve is a proprietary medium-roast blend that pairs well with yogurt, company officials said.

Based in Los Angeles, Pinkberry operates and franchises about 195 locations worldwide.

Contact Lisa Jennings at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter: @livetodineout


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Why the Greek yogurt fad is here to stay

Get used to seeing these top Grek yogurt brands on story shelves. Experts say the America's love affair with yogurt will be long lived.

“I woke up one morning and I realized I was eating spackle,” said America’s Test Kitchen host, Chris Kimball, on a recent broadcast. He’s talking about yogurt, a food that can feel less like breakfast and more like penance. That is, until Greek yogurt came along.

It’s the Farrah Fawcett of dairy, going from nowhere to everywhere seemingly overnight. You can’t swing a cat these days without hitting Greek yogurt.

“If food provides only novelty, it’s a fad. If it saves time, money and has a halo of health, its here for the long run.”

— Harry Balzer, chief industry engineer of NPD, a consumer marketing research firm.

Dairy case shelves bulge with endless cups of it. Post adds it to Honey Bunches of Oats. Manufacturers are blending it with cream cheese and even hummus. Pinkberry, the nation’s top frozen yogurt retailer offers an exclusive non-frozen Greek yogurt for breakfast. And in the “please-make-it-stop” category, meet Powerful Yogurt, aka “brogurt” --Greek yogurt for men that “meets the health and performance needs of busy men living an active lifestyle.”

According to the consumer market research group Packaged Facts, Greek yogurt’s share of the refrigerated yogurt market has risen to 35 percent, up from a measly 1 percent in 2007. Packaged Facts forecasts that the overall market for refrigerated yogurt and yogurt drinks, worth $7.3 billion in 2012, will grow to $9.3 billion by 2017.

Thanks to Greek yogurt, New York surpasses California in yogurt production by more than 100 million pounds, according to Dairyreporter.com. Upstate New York has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of Yogurt.”


Watch the video: Pinkberry Greek Yogurt Launch: FOX Business (September 2021).