New recipes

Make the Best Stuffing Ever by Using This 1 Store-Bought Ingredient

Make the Best Stuffing Ever by Using This 1 Store-Bought Ingredient


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Bagged stuffing will never be boring again

Stuffing never gets the respect it deserves.

Stuffing (or as it’s known when it isn’t stuffed into anything, dressing) is one of the unsung heroes of the holiday season, an easy-to-make side dish that requires little effort, especially if you’re using the bagged version. It serves as the perfect counterpoint to ham and turkey, and is also an ideal filler if you’re looking to pad out a smaller meal or leftovers. Store-bought stuffing can be a little bit lacking in the flavor department, however, but we’ve got one trick that’ll give your stuffing the umami kick it so desperately needs: chicken base.

Instead of using regular chicken or turkey stock in your stuffing, opt for the no salt added variety. This way, it’ll take on all of that rich flavor but none of the saltiness. Stir in a couple teaspoons of chicken base (we’re fans of Better Than Bouillon) to even out the salt level, and at the same time provide a rich, deep, chickeny boost that will make this stuffing the best you’ve ever had.

Oh, and if your gravy is also tasting a little bit wan, a dollop of chicken base will work wonders.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.


Cornbread Stuffing

Truth: Not everyone likes classic Thanksgiving stuffing. However, it&rsquos hard to be mad at sweet, crunchy-yet-tender cornbread stuffing. We're okay with this fact. Also known as cornbread dressing, this dish is a classic in the American South, where you&rsquoll often find it mixed with sausage, bacon, jalapeños, nuts, even chopped oysters. We kept ours simple, with flavors you&rsquod find in the classic stuffing.

What's the difference between stuffing and dressing?

It's up for debate. Some say that stuffing implies that it's stuffed inside the bird, and dressing is a casserole baked separately in a baking dish. For the most part, the terms are used interchangeably. (We usually call it stuffing, and don't usually stuff our turkey.)

Do I need to make my own cornbread?

No. We like to use our classic (and best) cornbread recipe, and we highly suggest you do the same. To make things easier, bake it the night before. BUT, you can start with store-bought or a mix. If using cornbread muffin mix, make sure that it will yield a lot.

Should I start with stale bread?

We like to&mdashit reduces the risk of stuffing sogginess and helps ensure the top gets super crispy. If you only have access to fresh cornbread, all is not lost: break up the cornbread into bite-sized pieces, spread on a sheet pan, and dry out the bread in a 200º oven for 20-30 minutes. Technically, you can use freshly baked, fully cooled cornbread, but your stuffing will be quite moist, more close to a corn casserole than a tender stuffing. (Of course, if you like your stuffing super-moist and only have stale bread, whisk in an extra cup of broth, the recipe can handle it.)

Why do I need eggs?

Cornbread stuffing is inherently crumbly, but the eggs help bind everything together! Otherwise, you've just got cornbread croutons mixed with sautéed veggies.