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Celebrate the Holidays with Gusto at the Waldorf Astoria Chicago

Celebrate the Holidays with Gusto at the Waldorf Astoria Chicago


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It’s not too late to make arrangements for a luxurious and truly unique holiday experience at the AAA Five-Diamond, Waldorf Astoria Chicago, recently named the #1 Hotel in the U.S. by Condé Nast Traveler readers. A festive four-course prix fixe menu is available on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, served in the lovely Balsan restaurant, and a late-night menu is offered in the Lobby Lounge at Bernard’s. Think ahead and book your New Year’s Eve plans at Balsan as well for a rich and rustic meal that will knock your celebratory socks off.

The Christmas menu is $90 per person with the option of customizable wine pairings for $55, which include cauliflower velouté, salt-roasted beets, or duck rillettes for the first course; king crab, foie gras, or a Brussels sprout salad for the second course; beef short rib, pan-seared halibut, or fettuccini for the third course; and, my favorite, a chocolate peppermint buche de Noel “Yule Log” for dessert.

The Waldorf Astoria Chicago is sure to get you in the holiday spirit. A lit-up grand 20-foot evergreen tree in the cobblestone courtyard greets you upon arrival, and the lobby is embellished with gorgeous festive garlands in colorful hues.

Should you choose to stay at the hotel, enhancement packages are available, which include in-room holiday décor, gift shopping, and spa treatments (kids can indulge in a manicure and pedicure served with ice cream)! “Waldorf Elves” assist guests looking for last-minute gifts — from robes and pajamas to designer jewelry and luxury grooming products. Guests also have the opportunity to have their suite decorated with an eight-foot Christmas tree and garland, creating magic while they are away from home.

New Year’s Eve is also a lovely time to visit the hotel, ending the year with panache. Balsan’s Final Eve five-course menu, priced at $125, includes a variety of dishes that take the land and sea into regard. Highlights include: Chanterelle velouté, lobster ravioli, seared scallops, smoked burrata, duck breast, and ribeye filet. Late-night snacks will be available at Bernard’s and the Lobby Bar and, of course, a Champagne toast will ring in the New Year with joy.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


Watch the video: Celebrate the Holidays with Studio McGee (June 2022).


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