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Are You Supposed to Wash Raw Chicken?

Are You Supposed to Wash Raw Chicken?


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You may be doing more harm than good

Just think of all the gross stuff you're 'washing' off.

You’re about to prepare a nice home-cooked meal using fresh cuts of raw chicken. And if you follow cooking tips you learned from grandma, you may be washing your raw chicken before turning it into a delicious grilled dish or simple weeknight dinner. But running water over a slab of raw poultry is just about the worst thing you can do with your kitchen sink.

In fact, it’s such a bad idea that the National Health Service (NHS) in Britain issued a public warning against the “sanitary” practice — claiming that “it can increase your risk of food poisoning from campylobacter bacteria.”

Chicken is a popular protein. But raw chicken is often contaminated with foodborne bacteria such as salmonella or campylobacter bacteria.

When washing chicken, most people tend to rinse it in the sink under running water rather than submerging it in the sink or a container. The splashes from the water can spread chicken juices onto your kitchen surfaces such as the countertop and contaminate your utensils or other foods in the area. Droplets can disperse up to 50 centimeters in front of a sink and up to 70 centimeters on every side of a sink. If not properly handled, it can make the dirtiest parts of your home even filthier or lead to food poisoning.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends not washing raw chicken. Making sure the meat is cooked thoroughly inside can help to prevent food poisoning due to eating raw or undercooked meat, so use a meat thermometer and make sure your chicken is cooked to 165 degrees.

The CDC also recommends washing your hands with warm soapy water before and after handling chicken. And once you’re done cooking, be sure to deep-clean your kitchen area to prevent the spread of bacteria. While you’re trying to figure out the best way to cook chicken, turkey and other meats, here are some bad cooking habits you need to stop now.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Why You Shouldn't Wash Raw Poultry, According to the USDA

Plus, helpful tips for preventing the spread of bacteria in your kitchen.

The benefits (or non-benefits) of washing raw chicken before cooking have been debated for decades. In fact, on an episode of Julia & Jacques Cooking At Home, Julia Child famously argued with her co-host, Jacques Pépin, saying that you need to wash chicken before roasting it—Pépin believed it wasn’t necessary, and that the oven’s heat “kills all the germs.” In 2018, Ina Garten joined team Pépin and also said there was no need to wash a chicken before placing it in the oven𠅊s it turns out, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on their side, too. On August 20, the department released study findings showing that washing or rinsing raw poultry actually puts you at risk of illness.

𠇎ven when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods,” Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety, said in the report. “The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

In order to help prevent illness when you’re preparing poultry (as well as other meat) at home, the USDA has three recommendations. First, that you prepare food that won’t be cooked (such as salad), before working with the raw meat—statistics show that 26 percent of study participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria to their salad lettuce, and 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing said poultry. (Even after trying to clean the sink, 14 percent still had bacteria remaining.) Then, it’s important to clean any surface that has touched the raw poultry and/or its juices—the combination of hot, soapy water and a sanitizer is best, according to the USDA. Also crucial? Wash your hands and any utensils/tools that touched the poultry, too. (Clean your hands immediately after handling, scrubbing for 20 seconds.)

The third tip from the USDA is to ensure that meat and poultry are cooked to a “safe internal temperature,” which you can measure with a food thermometer. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165 degrees Fahrenheit ground meats (aka burgers) are safe at 160 and beef, pork, lamb, and veal are safe to eat at 145. While you might be tempted to wash or brine your meat in saltwater, vinegar, or lemon juice, the USDA warns that that won’t destroy bacteria, either. Your best bet is to keep the surfaces around you clean, and make sure your meat is fully cooked.

We also have a guide from chefs detailing nine common mistakes to avoid when cooking chicken�lieve it or not, it’s actually much harder to cook than steak. However, if you remember to dry your meat in the fridge, brine it, and let it rest after cooking, you’re well on your way to a perfectly cooked piece of chicken. Check out the rest of the tips in our roundup.


Watch the video: Master Chef: Ένας καλός κτηνίατρος θα μπορούσε να σώσει αυτό το κοτόπουλο. Luben TV (May 2022).