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The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow

The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow


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The Golden Number

With one food truck at a wedding, you can normally cater for around 75 guests. You don’t want lines to get too long, as that would ruin the spectacle of the food truck, and run the risk of your guests getting snippy with each other. Most people catering from food trucks for a big wedding have two or three food trucks arrive at the same time to help break up the masses. Keep in mind that almost every food truck will cater weddings, they just require a guarantee of a certain number of people to be in attendance.

Flexible Venue

Food Trucks are widely popular in cities such as New York, Seattle, Austin, and Los Angeles. Typically, you can have the food truck set itself up wherever you fancy, whether it's directly outside the venue, or in the yard at the back of the venue. However, in cities like Chicago, there are stricter food truck laws. For example, an ordinance in Chicago requires food trucks to park 200 feet away from any restaurant, and doesn't allow them to sell for more than 2 hours at one location. Make sure you do your research before you book your food truck.

Amazing Food Options

Some of the most well known food trucks serve popular gourmet foods like tacos, sliders, cupcakes, and mini desserts. However, if you look hard enough, you'll be able to find food trucks that serve everything and anything. Are you a vegetarian? A vegan? Have a green truck come to your wedding! Are you catering to a heavily based cultural or traditional crowd that may enjoy their national foods? Have a German, Asian fusion, or Greek food truck, cater your wedding! The options are endless.

Flexible Dining Schedule

A big trend is having a food truck show up late at night to a venue to feed guest as they start to get hungry again after dancing. Many couples keep it a surprise, I mean, think about it: it's worth it just for the amazing photos you'll get. The joy an all your guests' faces when they bit into some hot, salty food after too many drinks, and a long night of partying, will show you that this was the right decision to make.

Save Money

Rather than paying for a catering company for a fancy, and crazily expensive 5-course sit down meal, you can create a more relaxed wedding, and save a lot of your wedding budget by hiring a food truck instead. Most prices hover near the $10 per person price range — a huge saving, without sacrificing any fun or tasty food!

Easy Clean Up

If the idea of spending the morning after your wedding sorting out dirty tableware sounds like hell, hiring a food truck is your saviour. Catering your big day from a food truck means that there will not be nearly as much cleanup as would be needed were you having a traditional sit-down meal: After your guests have eaten they can simply throw away their plates and utensils, saving you from any extra work the next day.

Entertain Your Guests Outside

The food truck option is a great way to entertain your guests busy during a reception or after a long night of lots of dancing. Instead of sitting around waiting for food at separate tables, guests can stand in line and mingle with other guests — this is the perfect way to get all of your guests to interact with each other, without forcing them to sit through hours of each others company at a long, over the top, dinner. What's more, having a food truck means everything can be done outside. There's no need for a marquee, and the whole party will be wonderfully relaxed without any fussy sit-down dining.

Hassle-Free Catering

Organizing for a food truck to be at your wedding is easy—most of the food trucks having websites that offer questionnaires that can be filled out with the click of a few buttons. Most established food trucks will also allow you to personalize your menu and create your own unique wedding-catering package so that your wedding can run exactly as you want it to.

Fresh, Tasty Food

Because food trucks bring the kitchen to the wedding, the food offered is often fresher, and tastier, than food that has been prepared elsewhere and brought to your wedding by caterers. Most food trucks cook a dish to order, resulting in the most delicious meal.

The Food Truck Con

The one “con” of having a food truck cater your wedding is something which is out of the control of every couple: the weather. While guests will love mingling outside in the warm, dry, Summer evenings, huddling under a food truck on a cold, wet night, isn't anyone's idea of the perfect wedding. The food will be just as good, but the guests might not enjoy being forced to stand outside in the rain.


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!


The Pros and Cons of Having a Food Truck Catered Wedding Slideshow - Recipes

Don’t you love the revealing moments people share about themselves that make you admire them all the more? I saw a post APPCA member April Lee shared on Facebook a couple of weeks ago that made me rush out a note to her asking if I could use it as the basis of a post here. Not only did April, owner of Tastefully Yours in the DC-Baltimore area, agree, but she shared even more information for me to put together here for you. I’d like to think of it as the inspiration we all need to do what we can in our communities during this pandemic. So, this is from April:

During this pandemic when it’s become extremely dangerous for older people to go out, I’ve been boxing up meals and delivering them to the senior citizens I know who can benefit from some well-made, nutritious meals. While I and many here are professional personal chefs, anyone can set aside an extra portion or two to offer to others. I have friends who are nurses and first responders. They also need ready-to-eat meals. So, consider reaching out to people you know (this is important as you cannot cook out of your home for strangers because of liability issues and health department regulations). But cooking for friends or acquaintances is fine and very much appreciated now. Just please be extra vigilant in following food safety guidelines when cooking, cooling and storing food. And maintain social distancing.

I wear a mask and gloves always when going out. I call the person to let them know when I’m coming. I call/text again once I arrive (just to make sure they are at home) and then leave the boxed meals in a bag at their front door. I will not leave food if they cannot bring it inside their home as I wave from inside my car.

I’ve been giving free meals to low-income senior citizens and families in my county every week since February of 2017. Because I work out of a leased commercial kitchen, I am able to do this. I would NOT encourage personal chefs who don’t have a commercial kitchen to even try this because it is in violation of all sorts of codes and regulations. Even if you’re giving the food away, you can’t cook out of your own residential kitchen. It’s been a good project for me, a way to use up extra ingredients and not waste anything. Many of my clients found out what I was doing and pay me a little extra to help offset my expenses for the groceries and containers for my “guests” (versus my paying clients). People like the idea of helping their community in a very direct way.

My suggestion for others to set aside portions of their home-cooked meals is because there is such a great need right now for ready-to-eat meals. Senior citizens, especially those who are elder orphans, are particularly vulnerable now because they don’t have family members checking in on them. And, as I said, first responders, nurses, doctors, hospital staff workers (think about all the minimum wage workers who are doing all the janitorial and housekeeping work in these hospitals), all need to eat after working days and shifts on end.

Again, I don’t want to give the impression that people can start providing meals to strangers. They absolutely cannot. HOWEVER, they can set aside a couple of portions of the dinners they are making for friends and acquaintances they know who could benefit from a tasty, nutritious, well-prepared meal. Many of the moms and dads who are still out there working because they must, would appreciate having dinner delivered for their families. Parents who are home with their young children now because daycare and schools are closed are struggling to balance getting their work done, taking care of the kids, helping them with online classes, and tending to household chores. You’d be amazed at just what a batch of freshly made chocolate chip cookies can do for a friend or acquaintance who’s overworked, over stressed, and sleep deprived. There are so many ways we can help and, now is the time for us to share our bounty and our talents with those in need. Not everyone knows a first responder, but everyone knows someone (probably many someones) who are pushed to their max right now. A prepared dinner is manna from heaven for these pandemic weary folks.

What kinds of service are you providing your community or your extended family these days? Send us your story!

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent or point of view to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!

Considering Working with an Intern? Ask Anne Blankenship!

APPCA member and personal chef Anne Blankenship has pretty much served as our reporter on the ground for personal chef transitions. The owner of Dallas’ Designed Cuisine a Personal Chef Service, Anne is working her way toward retirement and has written about that process for us. This week she outlines the process of hiring and working with an intern, the idea being that she could eventually refer incoming potential new clients.

If you’re looking for help and a way to pay forward the help you received when you were just starting out–or if you’re a culinary school student searching for some practical internship experience–you’ll want to ready this guest post by Anne:

They say too much of anything is not a good thing. When you have more business than you can handle, what do you do? I have recently found myself in the position of turning away clients on a weekly basis for the first time since I started my personal chef business. While I am thrilled that potential clients are calling, it is also frustrating to be unable to accommodate potential new business.

When I sat down to ponder this issue, a light bulb went off in my head. Recalling my days in culinary school I knew that there were required internships of students. I so “fondly” recall working for $5.85/hour, scrubbing fish scales out of the sink around midnight, and then mopping the floor! However, it was a great experience and when you are the “low person on the totem pole” you never say “that’s not my job.”

I contacted my alma mater (a local community college with an outstanding and highly rated culinary program) and sent a message to the head of the Food and Hospitality Institute at the college. The school’s culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation, and I of course knew that the “CPC” (“Certified Personal Chef”) designation was available through the organization. I told the chef that I wanted to hire a student for an internship as well as provide them with insight into a different area of the culinary world—that of a personal chef. I also reminded him that the “CPC” designation was a viable option, as many culinary instructors are unaware of this classification. He responded and said he would mention my internship to his classes and that the best option was for me to post it on the online job board for students, which I did at the end of August when school started. In addition, I contacted my clients to let them know I was considering hiring an intern. I wanted to check whether or not it would be alright with them that this person would accompany me on future cook dates.

I received a response to my ad within a week from a promising young student. However, I had neglected to post the days/hours that I needed the applicant, and his school schedule was such that he would not be available. After I amended the posting to include the hours, I received a second response at the end of September. This time I knew I had potentially found the right candidate in Tina, who is in her first semester. Like me, she had been in the corporate world for 20 years and wanted to change careers, had always wanted to be a chef, loved to cook, and had planned and executed dinner parties for friends with various cuisines and interesting dishes. We exchanged e-mails and as she told me more about herself I became certain that if she was interested, I could help her pursue becoming a personal chef as well as have someone viable to whom to refer new business.

We met for lunch a few days later and after three hours of discussion we made plans for her to accompany me on upcoming cook date at the beginning of October. Once at the client’s home I showed her the menu and recipes for that day and we divided up the tasks and who would make which menu item. Although I was watchful, I knew she was competent and I truly didn’t have to worry about the way she cooked the food. Everything she has done thus far has been excellent (and made me think I’ve been a little careless in the way I cooked some of my recipes!). Even better is that when we review the menu for the day and divide up tasks, she usually has a good idea of how to execute the recipes but always asks if she is not sure. Truly, she is the best person I could have gotten for the job!

The “end game” is that if she decides to pursue being a personal chef, I would help her get started and hopefully be able to refer any incoming potential new clients to her as I am quite satisfied with the client base I now have. I told her that it wasn’t all “philanthropical” on my end—she would be helping me so that I wouldn’t have to turn away business and she would benefit by having her own clients. I have been very honest with her about how clients come and go in the personal chef business, that you have to be flexible, manage your finances well and be prepared for what could happen. However, I also told her that being your own boss, making your own schedule, and truly enjoying what you do for a living is beyond compare to working in the corporate world. I still love what I do every day and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

She will be with me until the middle of December but has until the end of December to decide whether or not to go back to the corporate world or pursue her dream of being a chef.

I did not change my liability insurance policy as I did not know how long Tina would be with me. Since my insurance premium is due in December, I will take a look at everything at that time. When we talked she asked me what the “big picture” was and I said that I wanted to try and retire in 2020 and if the right person came along, I would consider turning my business over to them. I was working out details about possibly taking a percentage of the client fees for awhile when I turned over the business. I am still mulling over that idea. If Tina does not want to go forward with this then I will start over again next semester and possibly hire someone else. If I cannot find the right person, I will just keep on doing as I am now and turn business away.

If you are in a position to hire an assistant for your personal chef business, consider your local community college, as many of them now have excellent culinary programs. You have the ability to mentor someone (probably younger) and show them that there is so much more to the food industry than working at a restaurant. I feel it is one way for me to “pay it forward” for someone who wants to be a personal chef. I have the Internet presence, the knowledge and 12 years of experience to assist her in getting started. I believe she feels as strongly as I do about the “personal” in being a personal chef and how we interact with our clients’ families, children and lives. As a result, my tagline has now become “Personal Chefs – We Make a Difference in Peoples’ Lives.”

Have you considered working with an intern? What are your concerns about the hiring and collaboration process?

Not an APPCA member? Now’s the perfect time to join! Go to personalchef.com to learn about all the benefits that come with membership.

And if you are a member and have a special talent to share on this blog, let us know so we can feature you!