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Daniel Patterson Will Open a Restaurant Inside New Artist Haven Minnesota Street Project

Daniel Patterson Will Open a Restaurant Inside New Artist Haven Minnesota Street Project


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The upcoming restaurant from Daniel Patterson will serve visitors to the gallery as well as the local artists’ community

The restaurant and café will open later this fall.

San Francisco’s Daniel Patterson, the acclaimed chef behind the two-Michelin starred restaurant Coi, is set to open a restaurant and café within San Francisco’s Minnesota Street Project, an artists’ gallery space opening later this week.

Patterson, who also launched the first location of LocoL, his sustainable and community-oriented fast food project with Los Angeles chef Roy Choi earlier this year, will design a restaurant for gallery-goers and artists alike.

The chef told the San Francisco Chronicle that although he has “a million ideas” for the restaurant’s concept, he hasn’t settled on one just yet.

“We’re part of the larger whole,” Patterson said. “That’s our goal — to be as positive a contributor as possible to this really amazing project.” Both the café and restaurant are scheduled to open in the fall.

Later this year, LocoL will expand to Oakland and San Francisco, with more locations to follow. Last summer, Patterson stepped down as the executive chef of Coi, his fine-dining restaurant of nearly a decade, in order to become further involved with LocoL and to spend more time with his family.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Meet the next generation of great Bay Area chefs

One of San Francisco’s most celebrated chefs has retreated from the spotlight to nurture young, underrepresented talent.

Daniel Patterson is MIA. He won&rsquot be found in the kitchen of his Michelin-starred restaurant, Coi, or in any of his other five eateries that have helped to put California cuisine on the map in the past decade. In fact, he won&rsquot be found running a restaurant anywhere. So, where the hell is the man whom L.A. taco king Roy Choi recently dubbed (in a conversation with Time Out) &ldquoa poetic genius&rdquo? The 49-year-old has hung up his apron in order to accept a new role: He wants to mentor the next generation of California chefs in the hope of filling the cultural gaps in San Francisco&rsquos dining scene. As Patterson says, &ldquoSan Francisco is full of great French and Italian restaurants, but what if there were 15 great Palestinian fine-dining restaurants? Or 15 amazing Caribbean-inspired restaurants?&rdquo

Patterson, whose nonprofit Cooking Project teaches culinary skills to at-risk L.A. youth, is putting his money where his mouth is by partnering with four young chefs of color. Arab chef Reem Assil serves family-style meze dishes and tasty pastries in Oakland Mumbai-born chef Heena Patel delves into vegetable-heavy, upscale Indian cuisine at the Dogpatch Jamaican chef Nigel Jones brings jerk chicken and island cocktails to Mid-Market and Mexican-American chef Erik Anderson trucks in classic French fare with an emphasis on game birds at Coi.

&ldquoI tried Nigel&rsquos cooking, and there was nothing like it in the city,&rdquo notes Patterson, recalling the moment of his epiphany. &ldquoThen I thought, We can use our knowledge and our team in support of people and concepts that are maybe outside of our expertise. We&rsquoll do something fun, and we&rsquoll support someone to get to a place they maybe wouldn&rsquot otherwise get to.&rdquo

For diners, it&rsquos a chance to sample underrepresented cuisines concocted in modern, fresh ways. For the chefs, it introduces their cooking and heritage to a broader audience. And for Patterson, it&rsquos a chance to even the playing field. &ldquoWhen you talk about equity, unless there&rsquos representation at the ownership level, it is really incomplete,&rdquo he says. &ldquoRestaurants are not going to the solve the massive, deeply entrenched problems [this country has had since its founding], but it doesn&rsquot mean that we can&rsquot do whatever we can do.&rdquo That includes developing a whole system to address racial and gender inequality in the kitchen. &ldquoYou need to minimize the gap between your lowest-paid worker and your highest-paid worker,&rdquo says Patterson. &ldquoTreat people well and create an environment where they feel respected, where they treat each other with genuine human empathy.&rdquo

Will he return to the kitchen at some point? He insists that the swinging door is always open. But, for now, here are the young, talented chefs you should support (as he does) and their up-and-coming hot spots.


Watch the video: FDOT starts construction on I-75 interchange near Colonial Blvd (July 2022).


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